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Author Topic: Recording resonant acoustics (junk metal, etc.)  (Read 4467 times)
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Force Neurotic
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« on: February 05, 2015, 06:18:21 PM »

I've been attempting to experiment with new techniques to get a better (clearer, more detailed, more "present") quality from the junk metal I use. It occurred to me to ask others about possible methods I hadn't thought of.

Currently I record with one vocal mic, either cardioid or unidirectional, both not bad but not incredible quality. I'm sure this has something to do with my occasional problems like hiss, lack of depth despite not flat sound, or bad EQ balance, despite the most careful attention paid to leveling and mic placement. Any improvements I could make in those directions?

Does anyone use multiple types of microphones simultaneously, like a studio? Currently I might be able to do this, but am not sure if the mics themselves are good for it. Would the addition of a contact mic used in conjunction with a normal one produce a fuller, more detailed sound?

Would graphic equalisation play a strong role in getting a more accurate sound?

I record to type II cassette, would use of a digital, handheld hi-fi field recording device work better, perhaps?

What about actual physical location? - I record in a somewhat small room, therefore most of the time have to use reverb to "fill out" the sound slightly. Would this be unnecessary if I were to record in a bigger, emptier, more reverberant location, with some of the above techniques applied?

Apologies for the barrage of questions, but I figured it'd be worth a shot. My previous attempts at different places and variations on my current methods were too similar in results to continue with blind experimentation.
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TS
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« Reply #1 on: February 06, 2015, 12:37:55 PM »

In my experience, using two seperate mics, and then layering the recordings can be very effective for getting a sound that fills out the entire spectrum nicely. I've had some issues with phasing but always been able to fix that with an EQ.
« Last Edit: February 06, 2015, 12:43:39 PM by TS » Logged

FreakAnimalFinland
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« Reply #2 on: February 06, 2015, 02:43:55 PM »

I have done contact mic + regular microphone combinations.
I would say that most crucial is how you place the microphone and what quality microphone it is. Also metal objects rarely are at their best with maximum abuse. More delicate use may bring harder and more disturbing sounds. I think best is to do recording with totally closed headphones, when you can actually hear what sound microphone captures and how moving to to another angle of different distance changes. Often dramatic changes with very small changes.

Also having non-contact microphone in contact with metal object can result very good sounds if situation is right.
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TS
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« Reply #3 on: February 06, 2015, 04:02:45 PM »

A little off topic but do you have any recommendations for closed headphones?
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kettu
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« Reply #4 on: February 06, 2015, 04:24:31 PM »

http://solutions.3m.com/wps/portal/3M/en_EU/PPE_SafetySolutions_EU/Safety/Product_Catalogue/~/3M-PELTOR-FM-Radio-Headsets?N=7576577+3294361712+3294857473&rt=rud

these are fine, there might be different generations for quite cheap at the local hardware store etc.
no input volume, theres a volume booster gadget ive seen but havent needed it.

I bet you can put an endless amount of money on headphones as they are now an accessory. NO THANKS, I bought industrial grade cheapos.
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Coma Detox
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« Reply #5 on: February 06, 2015, 05:16:39 PM »

A little off topic but do you have any recommendations for closed headphones?

I've been using these forever http://en-us.sennheiser.com/professional-dj-headphones-noise-cancelling-hd-280-pro
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silentinstinct
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« Reply #6 on: February 06, 2015, 07:03:40 PM »

All of my junk metal recordings have been with 2 contact mics, 2 regular (non contact, really doesn't matter whether cardioid or omni but personal preference comes into play) microphones pointed towards the metal subject. All signals get sent to either my pedals, straight to my tape recorder with no fx or straight into my recording interface for a cleaner signal. I have noticed I get the clearest tones straight into the interface but I love the sound of my recorder so I rarely go that route.

I have the option of isolating the speaker cabinets I use in conjuction with my junk setup, by putting my speakers in a isolation booth, I can play with my junk in the control room free from feedback from the speakers. I also do recordings without the speaker, in the booth with my junk.

Hope this helps.
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bitewerksMTB
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« Reply #7 on: February 06, 2015, 11:35:01 PM »

I use a "digital, handheld hi-fi field recording device"  then dump to my 4-track through minimal effects. Metal sounds I do 'in studio' is with a drum trigger through minimal effects/distortion.  Occasionally, I'll use the handheld recorder for 'live' recordings in studio then record back to the 4-track. I think the type of metal objects used is more important than what I'm recording with. I like old wash tubs or trash cans.
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Coma Detox
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« Reply #8 on: February 07, 2015, 10:24:38 AM »

The best "junk metal" sound I've ever gotten was using an old metal oil drum with a sledge hammer with contact mics through distortion, delay and reverb mic'd through an 8x10 bass cabinet.
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TS
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« Reply #9 on: February 08, 2015, 03:49:46 PM »

A little off topic but do you have any recommendations for closed headphones?

I've been using these forever http://en-us.sennheiser.com/professional-dj-headphones-noise-cancelling-hd-280-pro

Noted. Thanks. Have you found them to have excessive bass or high end? I've had some issues before with headphones that have too much bass, making the mix sound unbalanced on other stereos and headphones.
« Last Edit: February 08, 2015, 03:57:05 PM by TS » Logged

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