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Author Topic: What are you reading  (Read 287429 times)
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tiny_tove
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ELETTRONICA RADICALE EDIZIONI


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« Reply #480 on: August 12, 2016, 11:11:38 PM »

Reading Alan Moore's Bojeffries,
Italian edition sucks, very bad translation, although some stuff is very difficult to translate in our language.

It some sort British Addams/Munsters meets Monty Python.
Some moments are absolutely epic.

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simulacrum
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« Reply #481 on: August 16, 2016, 04:10:01 AM »

Looking for a copy of Crad Kilodney's Lightning Struck My Dick. If anyone has any leads or looking to unload a copy, please let me know.
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Fluid Fetish
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« Reply #482 on: August 17, 2016, 03:49:00 AM »

Recently finished The Hermetic Tradition, and about to continue the Evola streak by beginning Revolt Against the Modern World. Before that was a text book on surrealism/dada, Making Tracks which is the Blondie book, and the Isten zine collection.

Also tons of comic book trash, usually while shitting. Hail Judge Dredd. 
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Deadpriest
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« Reply #483 on: August 17, 2016, 10:18:04 PM »

I'm reading The Concrete Garden by Ian Macewan and Closer by Dennis Cooper.

Concrete Garden gas the feel of a Perverse Enid Blyton book;  love.

Closer has an amazing dream like quality but the prose is not as good as in his later stuff; great.

I'm also very slowly working my way through the complete verse of the (criminally) almost anonymous visionary poet Bejamin DeCesseres; there are not words.
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david lloyd jones
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« Reply #484 on: August 19, 2016, 04:26:18 PM »

new issue of 'the dark side'. UK horror film mag, with articles on Boris Karloff film posters, the blinds babe from the beyond, SCI fi and the communist menace, monster films (rubber monster variety)
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cr
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« Reply #485 on: August 21, 2016, 05:39:14 PM »

Started to read this one

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Deadpriest
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« Reply #486 on: August 21, 2016, 06:28:45 PM »

Started to read this one



You're a genius I'm buying that!!!
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Deadpriest
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« Reply #487 on: August 21, 2016, 08:39:33 PM »

It's £2.21 for kindle download on Amazon ATM
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« Reply #488 on: August 24, 2016, 06:39:51 PM »

I'm reading The Concrete Garden by Ian Macewan and Closer by Dennis Cooper.

Concrete Garden gas the feel of a Perverse Enid Blyton book;  love.

Enid blyton is atouchstone writer for UK readers of a certain age so this comparison is provocative but true.
almost 'swallows and amazons'
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vomitgore
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« Reply #489 on: August 24, 2016, 06:50:15 PM »

Recently finished The Hermetic Tradition, and about to continue the Evola streak by beginning Revolt Against the Modern World. Before that was a text book on surrealism/dada, Making Tracks which is the Blondie book, and the Isten zine collection.

Very good pick! "Revolt against the Modern World" is understood to be Evola's core work on which his entire output is based. I actually read "Cavalcare la Tigre" before RatmW, which was pretty interesting as the latter is basically the foundation of Evola's contempt for modernism. I definitely recommend reading "The Metaphysics of War" directly after RoatmW, as the essays that are collected there are somewhat of an extention of the main work.

Coincidentally, reading "The Yoga of Power" at the moment and enjoying every page. Evola's eclectic approach to spiritualism is challenging but highly informative, as is always the case. This one may not be too interesting for those who are into his political thoughts, but comes recommended to readers who would like to explore the darker sides of Hinduism and the Left-Hand Path.
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david lloyd jones
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« Reply #490 on: August 24, 2016, 09:21:17 PM »

how many of the evola readers identify as fascist?
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Yrjö-Koskinen
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« Reply #491 on: August 24, 2016, 09:38:03 PM »

how many of the evola readers identify as fascist?
Without sarcasm: probably about as many as there are Habermas readers identifying as Communist.
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« Reply #492 on: August 27, 2016, 03:11:24 AM »

Reading Dimitris Liantinis - Gemma book. I am at 1 / 3 of it. Philosophy. "Heavy" subjects but surprisingly easy reading without be bad way simple, exactly the opposite. Pleasure !

Writer as a person became very well known here, when many years ago he disappeared to go die his own way by his own terms. Although they knew where he has gone -on a mountain- , police couldn't find him or his body. He had told to a cousin of his where his family will find his remains but made him promise he will keep this secret for some years. Cousin kept his promise and spoke 7 years later. More info about the writer here : https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dimitris_Liantinis

Subjects of the book, copy-pasted from a forum online :

Quote
α. Margaret's Question
Deals with the myth of Faust and how one ought to explore questions about the existence of God.

β. v = d * H
Is about the importance of the discovery of the expansion of the universe by Edwin Hubble and about beauty in nature.

γ. Concerning Circe
Gives a novel interpretation of the encounter between Ulysses and Circe in Homer's Odyssey.

δ. Onan and Cain
Starting with the Biblical figures of Onan and Cain, he explores two contrasting world-views: the ancient Greek and the ancient Jewish and assesses their impact on Western civilisation. In parallel, he explores the complementary concepts of Eros and Death.

ε. He who slept with men
Explores the nature of Socratic tragedy.

ζ. Cyclopean
Provides an interpretation of the myth of the Cyclops from the Odyssey and peels away the layers to reveal a set of instructions for how one should live out their lives.

η. The Hellenic Greek
Attempts to assess critically the difference between the quality of the civilization of ancient Greece and the status of modern Greece in the world today.

θ. Δp Δq >= h
Discusses the meaning of Heizenberg's Uncertainty Principle and Schroedinger's Cat thought experiment in relation to what one can truly know.

ι. This is Missolonghi!
Is arguably one of the more poetic chapters. An investigation of the life of the pre-Socratic philosopher Empedocles leads to an analysis of the ancient Greek attitude towards death.

κ. A minor arbiter
Deals with Eros as the Art of Departing

λ. Nekyia
Revisits the descent of Ulysses into the underworld (Nekyia). The nekyias of Aeneias, Jesus, Dante and Freud are then laid out and described in some detail and their common features are identified and analysed.

μ. Helen of Sparta
Deals with the myth of Helen of Troy. This is then used as a basis to talk about beauty in life, reason and nature.

ν. God is dead
Deals with the crisis of western civilization.

ξ. The Ironists
Analyzes the quality of the irony of Socrates, Sophocles, Jesus, Dostoyevsky and C.P. Cavafy. Discusses the true nature of tragedy.

ο. Narcissus
A lyrical journey through the constellations of the night sky. A parallel journey from ignorance and fear to knowledge and delight.

π. Sonne uber Austerlitz
A final statement.

A lecture of his -the only with english subs i could find- with similar subject as in the book - "Philosophical Consideration Of Death" : https://youtu.be/KuglHhTBpks
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Andrew McIntosh
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« Reply #493 on: August 27, 2016, 04:02:46 AM »

More info about the writer here : https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dimitris_Liantinis

Interesting, I appreciate that introduction. His notion that ancient Greek culture was influenced by the idea of death is very appealing (regardless of how "true" it is). And the last quote from that Wikipedia article has a nice little antinatalist touch.
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"Unless suffering is the direct and immediate object of life, our existence must entirely fail of its aim." - Schopenhauer.
cr
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« Reply #494 on: August 27, 2016, 01:19:49 PM »

Thank for mentioning Dimitris Liantinis! This seems to be a philosopher I could be interested in.
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