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Author Topic: What are you reading  (Read 287950 times)
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Vermin Marvin
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« Reply #330 on: November 30, 2014, 07:16:52 PM »

Hubert Selby (The Room, 1971.) Suom. Pentti Saarikoski. Otava, 1974.
Found from flea market, second time i read this, first time about 15 years ago and still same feeling.. it somehow make me feel better as do the other books of the writer.

Juha Hurme & Radiopuhelimet: Radiopuhelimet. Like 2006
Light reading but well worth what i paid for it, 0.20€ on librarys removal section.
Need to crab some record`s from them since this makes me think i have huge gab to fill on my knowledge.. they have always go just under my radar.

Next try to finish Kyynelten kallio: kertomuksia seksistä ja väkivallasta
by Teemu Keskisarja


but Jaakko Korjus : OtsaSSa kuoleman kuva : raportti suomalaisesta SS-vapaaehtoisjoukosta. Vaasa Oy Vaasa 1981 and Wikingin hurjat, romaani. Kirjayhtymä 1982 haunting bedside table .. as do too many other books.
  
« Last Edit: November 30, 2014, 07:18:24 PM by Vermin Marvin » Logged

RyanWreck
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« Reply #331 on: November 30, 2014, 08:37:33 PM »

Maybe quite silly question, but inspired by reading the really interesting 'Power Electronics Cinema' - article in Exoteric #6 again, I asked myself, if there are any recommended books, you would file under 'Power Electronics Literature'?

"Green River, Running Red" Ann Rule
"The Stranger Beside Me" Ann Rule

...and most people would obviously say anything by Peter Sotos.

+ De Sade, Georges Bataille, "The Turner Diaries", Andrea Dworkin, Junger's "Storm of Steel", Hugo Ball and Duchamps books on Dadaism, the diary of Wesley Allen Dodd (the name escapes me at the moment) and really any true crime books the best are sensationalist ones from the late 80s-mid 90's especially the crazier junk on satanic ritual abuse, Dennis Cooper, maybe the original works on Futurism, Alesiter Crowley's autobiography "Confessions", Delany's "Privatizing Public Sex", David Ernst "Musique concrete", etc. Really too many to think of off the top of my head. PE has a lot more substance and content than people give it credit for.
« Last Edit: November 30, 2014, 08:57:48 PM by RyanWreck » Logged
bitewerksMTB
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« Reply #332 on: December 24, 2014, 09:34:42 PM »

I've read everything by Dennis Lehane & all of his books are worth reading. I just finished "The Drop":

"This is so simple- you show up at the designated time, do the thing, and leave.  Why can't anyone just stick to a fucking  plan in this world anymore? Your generation, you pack your assholes with ADD  before you leave the house every morning?"

and

"I'm sorry , but you kids, you know? You don't have any manners. You go out of the house dressed like  you're
still in your living room. You say terrible things about women. You hurt harmless dogs. I'm tired of you, man."

Read in the last couple of months:

RITUAL, SKIN, PIG ISLAND, & currently reading GONE all by Mo Hayder
TORSOS by John Peyton Cooke (fiction based on Cleveland OH serial killer in the '30s; lots of homo sexual violence)
A FINE DARK LINE by Joe R. Lansdale ('coming of age' story during the '50s. lots of brutal racism; the 'fine dark line' refers to  relationships w/whites that are slowly changing)
THE CUT by George Pelecanos (Pelecanos writes good crime fiction & has something to do w/"The Wire" but I've never seen a single episode)
THE WHISPERERS by John Connolly (excellent crime author)
DARK HOLLOW by Brian Keene (horror fiction)
THE MURDERER VINE by Shepard Rifkin (Northern private detective hired to do some dirty work in the South, lots of violence & racism. This is one of the Hardcase Crime books)
LAST DAYS by Adam Nevill (excellent supernatural horror fiction; the other book by Nevill I had read, THE RITUAL, was okay)
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bitewerksMTB
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« Reply #333 on: December 24, 2014, 09:36:54 PM »


I believe I have a spiral bound, Xeroxed version of this book.
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tiny_tove
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ELETTRONICA RADICALE EDIZIONI


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« Reply #334 on: December 25, 2014, 12:03:02 AM »

anybody has it on file?
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Coma Detox
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« Reply #335 on: December 25, 2014, 05:29:50 AM »

[i][/i]


Forgot I had these stashed away at work.  Makes for good bathroom reading material.
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cantle
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« Reply #336 on: December 26, 2014, 03:20:55 AM »

The Amok journal section of autoerotic deaths is worth a look.
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TS
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« Reply #337 on: December 26, 2014, 01:59:36 PM »

Yes I recently went and purchased the "Amok Journal - Sensurround Edition, A Compendium of Phycho-Physiological Investigation" on the recommendation of someone from this forum, and its really good reading, fairly short articles with photos on a range of topics, NSK, Autoerotic Deaths, Infrasound, Amputee Fetishism and more. Great book to have laying around the living room for a quick read here and there.
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acsenger
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« Reply #338 on: January 25, 2015, 01:27:20 AM »

Henry Kissinger - World Order (Reflections on the Character of Nations and the Course of History)

Having so far read 180 of the almost 400 pages, I'm liking this book a lot. It examines the current and past world orders, that is, the relationships between nations, focusing mostly on post-mid-17th century history (as that's when the modern state system appeared in Europe). I've so far read the chapters about Europe and the Muslim world; next is Asia and then the US. The writing style is for the most part easy to read, with just a few parts that need re-reading to fully understand.
Some parts are a reminder that Kissinger was an American national security advisor and secretary of state as he clearly outlines what American interests were in the past or should be in the future, but that's to be expected and at least he's not masking the fact that his point of view is often not neutral. All in all, a great book about world history through the lens of interstate relations and about current world affairs as well.
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Harcamone
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« Reply #339 on: March 08, 2015, 10:40:44 PM »

Watchmen by Alan Moore - Been putting it off for way too long! Probably going to read Lost Girls after I finish this. Aso interested in From Hell.

Close to the Knives by David Wojnarowicz - So far, a great memoir about being fucked up and queer in the height of AIDS. Similar in style to Kathy Acker, visible Genet influence.

The Good Nurse by Charles Graeber - Gripping and excellently written true crime. Incredible all of the compexities and bureacratic messiness that allowed Cullen to go on killing for so long!

Also starting Ligotti's Conspiracy Against the Human Race but I'm not deep into it yet.
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cdlevy
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« Reply #340 on: March 12, 2015, 12:17:41 AM »

Read The Collector, which one might add to the list of books that might interest users of special-interests.net specifically. It is about a guy who abducts a girl, told half from the pereptrator's and half from the victim's perspective. I did not have the appropriate mental equipment to take much else from it than a horror story. There is some kind of vague criticism made towards the common man's desire to "own" through the main character, but personally it didn't lead into any grander insights or revelations.
« Last Edit: March 12, 2015, 01:56:13 AM by cdlevy » Logged

LP
Zoladingoing
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« Reply #341 on: March 14, 2015, 05:41:36 PM »

I did not read for a while but the last book was Notes from the underground by Fyodor Dostoyevsky, about an angry man, educated and intelligent, unaffected by people, choosing to live by himself with strongly violent speech, and threats. Back then I was in a total shock by the nature of that book. Heck Even Nietzsche liked it.
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Baglady
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« Reply #342 on: March 21, 2015, 05:00:43 PM »

Read The Collector

Good one! It has stuck with me somehow. One of the few books where I pretty much remember everything, even though years has gone by. I love The Magus as well. Close to a masterpiece, that one. Have the short story collection The Ebony Tower by John Fowles in my shelf as well since many years, but I haven't got around to read it yet for some reason.
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firstcircle
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« Reply #343 on: April 03, 2015, 03:07:36 PM »

I did not read for a while but the last book was Notes from the underground by Fyodor Dostoyevsky, about an angry man, educated and intelligent, unaffected by people, choosing to live by himself with strongly violent speech, and threats. Back then I was in a total shock by the nature of that book. Heck Even Nietzsche liked it.
Notes from Underground is a classic. If you enjoyed that try Crime & Punishment, my favorite of Dostoevsky's longer works. I've read it a couple times and it's really a masterpiece of psychological / crime fiction. Don't let the length scare you away.

Just finished American Pastoral by Philip Roth. It was good in the way post-50s American Literature's supposed to be good, but I'm happy I'm done with it. It was a clear capsule of America and the shock of the revolutionary movements of the 60s and 70s, and the 'why me' response of the older generation unprepared to deal with a malevolent force from within being directed at their way of life. As I said, American Literature dealing primarily with the conflicts and inner turmoil of living in America after WW2.
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Zoladingoing
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« Reply #344 on: April 10, 2015, 09:16:51 AM »

I did not read for a while but the last book was Notes from the underground by Fyodor Dostoyevsky, about an angry man, educated and intelligent, unaffected by people, choosing to live by himself with strongly violent speech, and threats. Back then I was in a total shock by the nature of that book. Heck Even Nietzsche liked it.
Notes from Underground is a classic. If you enjoyed that try Crime & Punishment, my favorite of Dostoevsky's longer works. I've read it a couple times and it's really a masterpiece of psychological / crime fiction. Don't let the length scare you away.

Just finished American Pastoral by Philip Roth. It was good in the way post-50s American Literature's supposed to be good, but I'm happy I'm done with it. It was a clear capsule of America and the shock of the revolutionary movements of the 60s and 70s, and the 'why me' response of the older generation unprepared to deal with a malevolent force from within being directed at their way of life. As I said, American Literature dealing primarily with the conflicts and inner turmoil of living in America after WW2.


bought crime and punishment few years ago I know it is a decent book but for whatever odd reason never checked it out all this time. with Dostoevsky length won't be an issue as i finished before the brothers Karamazov and if I am not mistaken it was Dostoevsky longest works....wow that chapter the grand inquisitor, the information around us says that Dostoevsky was Christian but his use of Satan is nothing like Goethe or Baudelaire, even far away from Milton romantic framework (but I think Dostoevsky & Milton share the same political views) anyways Dostoevsky devil is rather based on "actual" facts such as the examination of conscience, psychology, sociology and herd mentality. what worse Dostoevsky let it seems like it is morally justified. I know William Blake once said this :  "Milton was on Satan's side and didn't know it" but that is totally not the case with Dostoevsky. because there is no sympathy here but only cold data and statics.  
« Last Edit: April 10, 2015, 09:18:35 AM by Zoladingoing » Logged
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