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Author Topic: Real studio experience  (Read 1746 times)
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Stipsi
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« on: November 03, 2017, 04:48:39 PM »

Someone has a real pro studio experience in recording hn/pe?
I had one experience, because a friend of mine works in a pro studio in my town and onestly it wasn't great as I expected.
One of the Audio engineer didn't understand the "always red clipping mixer" and we discussed a lot in this.
At the end of the session I listen to the takes and there was no big difference to the ones i record at home.
Has someone better experiences?
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Duncan
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« Reply #1 on: November 03, 2017, 06:46:20 PM »

I think that studio work of any kind works best if you consider it a collaboration with the engineer/s. Neither party should go in with too fully formed an idea of what is going to happen and both should be willing to experiment.  They need to understand that what they're helping produce is something outside the usual rules of the bullshit rock they're normally working on and you need to be open to their methods of getting the best out of their space and equipment.  This, I believe, is the case for 'our' kind of music at least.  The situation would be different if you were one of those bullshit rock bands.

Maybe a good way to think about these kinds of studios as a noise artist is simply that you're temporarily gaining access to a load of (probably) better gear that you've got at home.  This means better mics and amps, better acoustic space and better outboard gear to run audio sources/finished pieces through for extra shape and body.  The results could be excellent in a situation like this but I'd prefer to take everything away as material which I'll finalise and collage together myself.



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Stipsi
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« Reply #2 on: November 03, 2017, 07:02:04 PM »

I think that studio work of any kind works best if you consider it a collaboration with the engineer/s. Neither party should go in with too fully formed an idea of what is going to happen and both should be willing to experiment.  They need to understand that what they're helping produce is something outside the usual rules of the bullshit rock they're normally working on and you need to be open to their methods of getting the best out of their space and equipment.  This, I believe, is the case for 'our' kind of music at least.  The situation would be different if you were one of those bullshit rock bands.

Maybe a good way to think about these kinds of studios as a noise artist is simply that you're temporarily gaining access to a load of (probably) better gear that you've got at home.  This means better mics and amps, better acoustic space and better outboard gear to run audio sources/finished pieces through for extra shape and body.  The results could be excellent in a situation like this but I'd prefer to take everything away as material which I'll finalise and collage together myself.
I agree with you.
Probably mine was only a bad experience with a lot of misunderstanding with audio engineer.



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drunk
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« Reply #3 on: November 04, 2017, 03:34:05 AM »

I think that studio work of any kind works best if you consider it a collaboration with the engineer/s. Neither party should go in with too fully formed an idea of what is going to happen and both should be willing to experiment.  They need to understand that what they're helping produce is something outside the usual rules of the bullshit rock they're normally working on and you need to be open to their methods of getting the best out of their space and equipment.  This, I believe, is the case for 'our' kind of music at least.  The situation would be different if you were one of those bullshit rock bands.

Maybe a good way to think about these kinds of studios as a noise artist is simply that you're temporarily gaining access to a load of (probably) better gear that you've got at home.  This means better mics and amps, better acoustic space and better outboard gear to run audio sources/finished pieces through for extra shape and body.  The results could be excellent in a situation like this but I'd prefer to take everything away as material which I'll finalise and collage together myself.

Some wise words here.
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Into The Grave is probably the best death metal record ever.
NaturalOrthodoxy
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« Reply #4 on: November 08, 2017, 01:20:37 PM »

Nail on the head, Duncan.

I recently recorded an album in a studio, mostly because the engineer is a close friend and I had always wanted to record with him previously when in black metal bands but the other members never went for it. I said 'fuck it, I'll record my noise with him' and it turned out great because I went in with no expectations.

I improvised a load of noise using great gear I would otherwise have no access to (Korg MS-20, huge Ampeg bass cab, the engineer's entire pedalboard, incredible room and vocal mics) and expertise I haven't grasped yet myself (recording set-up plus Pro-Tools fluency).

The engineer then edited it down to the bits that most grabbed him and essentially did all the producing. The result was a pretty varied album with elements I would never have considered bringing in on my own, as well as the engineer's preconceptions about noise (he's not a fan) being challenged.

I would 100% call it a collaboration with the engineer rather than the engineer simply recording something as straightforward as I would record at home.

You can hear a track of it here, it's going to be released on Phage Tapes soon- https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vYy1LnSnRTw&t=66s
« Last Edit: November 08, 2017, 01:22:31 PM by NaturalOrthodoxy » Logged

pentd
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« Reply #5 on: April 18, 2018, 11:31:42 AM »

been in a real studio 2x --nice acoustics + amps + mega cool mikes... whats not to like!! but again, with todays technology not a necessity. i would say that the DAW is the most important tool nowadays. use a studio to collect sounds you can't access on your own maybe?
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l.b.
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« Reply #6 on: April 22, 2018, 07:15:29 AM »

Nail on the head, Duncan.

I recently recorded an album in a studio, [...] it's going to be released on Phage Tapes soon- https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vYy1LnSnRTw&t=66s

no wonder this record sounds so good!
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NaturalOrthodoxy
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« Reply #7 on: April 23, 2018, 10:13:10 AM »

Nail on the head, Duncan.

I recently recorded an album in a studio, [...] it's going to be released on Phage Tapes soon- https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vYy1LnSnRTw&t=66s

no wonder this record sounds so good!

ha, cheers! I've recorded another 16 minutes of material this year which will see a tape release on Phage Tapes soon. I recorded it myself at home- the overall sound is clear but quite "retro" in places as there some Alberich/Haus Arafna style rhythmic industrial tracks on there.

Here's a preview track for those interested: https://soundcloud.com/naturalorthodoxy/new-british-empires-from-industrial-action/s-OOAK8
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