Special Interest
August 12, 2020, 05:22:51 PM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
News:
 
   Home   Help Login Register  

Pages: 1 ... 194 195 196 197 198 199 [200] 201 202
  Print  
Author Topic: Seen and not seen's, recommendations and queries on top films in general.  (Read 825102 times)
0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.
ConcreteMascara
SI Staff
Diehard user
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 1414



WWW
« Reply #2985 on: July 07, 2020, 04:03:43 PM »

Was sad to hear of Morricone's passing as well, but living to 91 years... you can't complain too much about that!

Two weeks ago I watched Avengers: End Game after watching all of the Marvel movies in release order over the past few months. I saw only a handful in the theaters so it was interesting be able to see how they weaved it all together over a decade. Obviously I get that there's a shit load of Marvel comics story lines that back-boned it but still to get it all the way to the last two Avengers movies and stick the landing was impressive to me. On an individual movie level or even series level there's a lot of things to pick at and criticize and those comments might be valid enough, but for me, bashing these movies because they're different than other movies I like is pointless and meaningless. Is Captain Marvel as good as Tarkovsky's Solaris, no. Is it easy fun, sure. Are most giallo films silly sleazy, nonsensical affairs? Yes. Do I love them anyway? Yes. I love them because of that. I would say most of what I watch are genre films that don't aspire beyond their basic premise and I love them for it. So why would I criticize comic books movies for being comic book movies? I guess my point is I was able to enjoy the Marvel movies for what they were instead of what they weren't and the experience has made the pandemic less bad. It also made my fiance happy because she can only handle so many yakuza or slasher films.

On a totally different note, last weekend I watched Samurai Spy by Masahiro Shinoda. I worship Shinoda's Pale Flower, but had no idea how this would stack up. While it didn't become an instant favorite like Pale Flower, I enjoyed the hell out of it. Out the gate you get a barrage of factions and names to try and remember, but I didn't find it to be nearly as complicated as some reviews claimed. It's 3 factions, 1 main character, some other important players. I didn't find it to be any harder to follow than a Kurosawa flick or other samurai genre films. What I thought more than anything was it felt sooo much like an anime about ninjas and samurai. Especially the one spymaster dressed in all white with a grappling hook weapon thing and the cool slow motion jumping and freeze frame tricks. In a lot of ways it reminded me of Ninja Scroll, but without titties and demons... which I guess is the majority of Ninja Scroll so maybe its a bad comparison. The back and forth between ninja action and exposition also felt very anime. I can definitely recommend.
« Last Edit: July 07, 2020, 11:47:53 PM by ConcreteMascara » Logged

online prowler
Overkill user
******
Offline Offline

Posts: 1509



WWW
« Reply #2986 on: July 12, 2020, 04:05:25 PM »

Samurai Spy by Masahiro Shinoda is a classic. I presume you saw the Criterion restoration version? I see what you mean by Ninja Scroll. I was having the same reference when I saw it. Haven't seen either in some time now, so should revisit soon.

I don't recall what I saw or wrote I saw here last time. Been a few since that, but one of the latest that stuck to mind was the US film The Eyes of Laura Mars from 1978 directed by  Irvin Kershner. Starring the royal Faye Dunaway and actor Tommy Lee Jones in the main leads. The original treatment was written by John Carpenter and if I recall correctly he was also supposed to direct the film, but that did not ripe to fruit. This is a genre film in the realm of giallo and thriller. The psychosexual kind with serial killer. I can wholeheartedly recommend this to any fans of Giallo films. Check the trailer here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f_-4L-mssnQ
Logged
absurdexposition
Diehard user
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 811



WWW
« Reply #2987 on: July 12, 2020, 04:08:48 PM »

The Eyes of Laura Mars from 1978 directed by  Irvin Kershner. Starring the royal Faye Dunaway and actor Tommy Lee Jones in the main leads. The original treatment was written by John Carpenter and if I recall correctly he was also supposed to direct the film, but that did not ripe to fruit. This is a genre film in the realm of giallo and thriller. The psychosexual kind with serial killer. I can wholeheartedly recommend this to any fans of Giallo films. Check the trailer here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f_-4L-mssnQ

I had pretty much the opposite review when I watched it: Pretty underwhelming American giallo. Fulci did the whole psychic vision thing better with, well, The Psychic the previous year. There are shades of De Palma throughout, but I wonder what this would have been like had John Carpenter helmed it instead of merely having written the screenplay.
Logged

Scream & Writhe distro and Absurd Exposition label
Montreal, QC
https://www.screamandwrithe.com

Primitive Isolation Tactics
Atrophist
moderate user
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 85



« Reply #2988 on: July 12, 2020, 09:55:12 PM »

I recently watched Ultras, an Italian film about a (fictional) firm of football hooligans in Naples (not to be confused with the 80’s film Ultra, this one came out in 2020).

The film focuses on Sandro, the leader of the old guard of the firm, who is pushing fifty and beginning to question his life choices. Especially now that he is banned from the stadium and he has to report to a police station during each match, to prove he is not causing more trouble.

I was surprised to see the film mostly got negative reviews, and for many commentators the reason they didn’t like it was that ”it wasn’t as good as Green Street Hooligans”. What the hell are these people on? Frodo as a hooligan? An American actor playing the leader of the, West Ham was it, hooligan firm, with a goofy British accent and strutting around like he has an invisible brick hanging from his balls?

Easy to recommend to anyone into hooligan/skinhead/other subculture films.
Logged
holy ghost
Diehard user
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 563



« Reply #2989 on: July 13, 2020, 03:44:09 AM »

Suspira remake - really enjoyed it. Obviously a big fan of the original, I thought they did a great job.

The Old Guard - good solid action flick if not exactly superb writing. Fun! I liked it.

The Great - good show, very funny.

Fleabag - hysterically funny
Logged
ConcreteMascara
SI Staff
Diehard user
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 1414



WWW
« Reply #2990 on: July 14, 2020, 09:36:34 PM »

Cure - 1997 [dir. Kiyoshi Kurosawa]
I have been trying to watch this one for a long time. Found out the today it was on the Criterion Channel. Happily i already took the day off, so it’s providence. So much better than i could have ever anticipated. It’s dark ambient as film in the best way possible. Visually impeccable, sound design amazing, placing just right. I was totally enthralled. And skips all the worst tropes of j-horror too. Highest recommendation!
Logged

aububs
Heavy user
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 311


« Reply #2991 on: July 15, 2020, 12:01:36 AM »

yeah Cure is incredible. i highly recommend the movie Angel Dust (1994) if you haven't seen it already. very similar in tone, agenda and execution to Cure. and just as good.
Logged
ConcreteMascara
SI Staff
Diehard user
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 1414



WWW
« Reply #2992 on: July 15, 2020, 03:31:43 PM »

I've actually got a VHS copy of Angel Dust on the way right now thanks to eBay [it feels like 1999 all over again]. Very excited to watch. Apparently there was only ever a VHS release in the US and by the New York Times no less.

Watching Cure had me thinking a lot of Splatter: Naked Blood which is pretty different plot was but aspects of the visuals, execution and sound felt weirdly similar. I think it's just something about the extreme disaffection/emotional malaise in '90s Japanese cinema that really ties a lot of it together. a real absence of joie de vivre . I appreciate it
Logged

Atrophist
moderate user
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 85



« Reply #2993 on: July 16, 2020, 04:11:50 AM »

Watched Chilean/German experimental, avant-garde horror Luz. Some interesting visuals and setpieces, but that’s about it. There is practically no plot, yet the film still manages to be confusing at times. And even at only 70 minutes still feels too long. If you liked Beyond the Black Rainbow this might be worth your while.
Logged
ConcreteMascara
SI Staff
Diehard user
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 1414



WWW
« Reply #2994 on: July 17, 2020, 03:25:18 PM »

Angel Dust - 1994 [dir. Sogo Ishii] - damn this VHS arrived quick! apparently it was published by the New Yorker, not the New York Times. Looked pretty good for a 24 year old VHS but I'd love to see this one on Blu-ray. Let me say first that the electronic score for the film is the most 1994 thing possible in the best way. Some of the pieces are the expected dark ambient drones and scrapes, but some of it is dub with a breakbeat and other parts are slow-mo techno. Reminds me of Biosphere's score for Insomnia or the soundtrack for Boogiepop Phantom. I love '90s electronic music :)  The movie itself? Well it starts off pretty spooky and serious, sorta kinda, but by the 2/3rd mark it becomes more of a weird thriller more focused on style than substance. Now the style is very good so it kept me interested mostly, but I will say by the end I felt it was a little long. I can't help but compare it to Cure which I watched only two days prior. Where Cure felt like an extremely cohesive whole where every frame, sound, piece of dialogue served to deliver a very specific idea and feeling, this felt much less refined and way more like a "movie" than an "art film". Obviously I can get down with either but Cure was so good on every level I immediately wanted to re-watch it, where as with Angel Dust I just wanted to look stills from it.  Also, I've never seen the show Hannibal but I feel like Angel Dust could be the link between Hannibal and Twin Peaks via Japan?

edit - thinking a little harder, the difference between Cure and Angel Dust is Cure had a message of weight under its psychological thriller trappings, Angel Dust did not, but it looked cool as hell.
« Last Edit: July 17, 2020, 03:31:49 PM by ConcreteMascara » Logged

online prowler
Overkill user
******
Offline Offline

Posts: 1509



WWW
« Reply #2995 on: July 18, 2020, 12:51:42 PM »

Kiyoshi Kurosawa's Cure is a contemporary classic in my book. Dense with atmosphere and very etheral. Sharing to a degree the core theme of Cure is the English film The Ghoul (2016). It is directed by Gareth Tunley and produced by Ben Wheatley. Just as Cure a homicide detective is the main characther who is investigating multiple murders. Things start to go slightly akward when he goes undercover. See the trailer here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XKmhU8c6hc0
Logged
aububs
Heavy user
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 311


« Reply #2996 on: July 18, 2020, 06:28:12 PM »

going to try and track down The Ghoul, never heard of that one

there's another japanese movie i've wanted to see for a long time because it also sounds similar to Cure but i haven't been able to find a watchable copy yet. It's called MARKS from 1995.

i did find it on youtube but the quality isn't great so i haven't bothered with it

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0ZLcBhMPN-8
Logged
ConcreteMascara
SI Staff
Diehard user
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 1414



WWW
« Reply #2997 on: July 22, 2020, 05:22:33 PM »

there's another japanese movie i've wanted to see for a long time because it also sounds similar to Cure but i haven't been able to find a watchable copy yet. It's called MARKS from 1995.

i did find it on youtube but the quality isn't great so i haven't bothered with it

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0ZLcBhMPN-8

Wow just looking at the description on Letterboxd it sounds interesting. What is it about Japanese cinema and especially '90s Japanese cinema that produces such interesting results? I guess the collapse the economic bubble and film bubble allowed people to come in and do weird things with low budgets or budgets based on VHS sales, but still, it feels like an endless well of weird shit to watch.
Logged

host body
moderate user
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 60


« Reply #2998 on: July 22, 2020, 05:24:34 PM »

high life by claire denis was really good. kind of a mixture between cronenberg and tarkovsky, claustrophobic and non-linear arthouse scifi. robert pattison has quite a solid filmography, looks like he's both a great actor and has great taste when choosing his parts. good time, the previous safdie brothers movie before uncut gems is one of my favourites from this decade.
« Last Edit: July 22, 2020, 05:26:50 PM by host body » Logged
absurdexposition
Diehard user
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 811



WWW
« Reply #2999 on: July 22, 2020, 05:28:35 PM »

high life by claire denis was really good. kind of a mixture between cronenberg and tarkovsky, claustrophobic and non-linear arthouse scifi.

"Solaris with a sex room."

robert pattison has quite a solid filmography, looks like he's both a great actor and has great taste when choosing his parts

Check The Rover if you haven't seen it.
Logged

Scream & Writhe distro and Absurd Exposition label
Montreal, QC
https://www.screamandwrithe.com

Primitive Isolation Tactics
Pages: 1 ... 194 195 196 197 198 199 [200] 201 202
  Print  
 
Jump to:  


Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.21 | SMF © 2015, Simple Machines Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!
Page created in 0.229 seconds with 19 queries.