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Author Topic: Mono vs. stereo  (Read 1554 times)
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Force Neurotic
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« on: May 29, 2017, 07:30:23 PM »

So, lately I've been messing around more with production specifics; most significantly, the debate over which type of sounds are best presented in mono, which are in need of stereo, and why. When recording a rock piece (or music that requires more traditional instrumentation), you have a basic idea of what should and shouldn't be mono, it's basically cut and dry. The kind of thing I do, though, isn't really something you can consult your amateur mixing-for-dummies resources to get advice on.

With more experimental music, however, there's really no indicator of what should be stereo or mono, except for heavy bass, which generally (always) should be mono. How do folks here determine what to put in stereo or what to make mono in compositions? What sort of sounds and sound ranges/types fall into one category or the other?
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F_c_O
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« Reply #1 on: June 03, 2017, 01:49:03 PM »

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=57iD9HhVHOo
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urall
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« Reply #2 on: August 23, 2017, 12:01:24 PM »

interesting indeed to check the switch between mono/stereo while mixing. Never thought of that.
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calaverasgrande
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« Reply #3 on: August 27, 2017, 05:19:35 AM »

I think mono recordings are a good place to start. If your mix can't balance without sticking thing in the right and left corners than it kind of needs help?
On the other hand, we no longer have to worry about the physical limits of analog mediums. So you can stick a very loud bass signal in one side or the other. Or both. And it wont break anything.
I hear you about the context and mixing things.
When I was a live sound guy I thought I was the shit. I did hip-hop, punk, metal, folk and it all came off great. Then I did sound for some of your HNW, drone and glitch act and I was pretty befuddled. Like I wanted to do more than just take a stereo pair off the stage?
But am I a dick if I add reverb? How do I know if it's too bassy or harsh in the mids?
Does the artist want it that harsh in the mids?
Heck, wtf do mastering engineers do when presented with something unconventional that they do not have a reference for?
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