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Author Topic: Collage Art  (Read 62373 times)
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« Reply #15 on: July 03, 2013, 12:02:57 AM »

Christer Themptander is a Swedish collage/montage artist I really enjoy. Very 70's leftwing style satirical content but often pleasing to me on a purely aesthetical level.

This is quality.
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« Reply #16 on: July 06, 2013, 12:39:47 AM »

Are Mokkelbost.

Paper collage series ION. Check top left menu.

http://www.b-o-r-g.org/

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l.b.
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« Reply #17 on: July 08, 2013, 06:59:34 AM »

i made this today
« Last Edit: July 11, 2014, 11:56:29 PM by l.b. » Logged
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« Reply #18 on: July 20, 2013, 08:01:03 PM »

When the word "transgressive" is used, it always seems like the person is trying to play down being offended. I'm not sure I've ever come across an artist who has stated their intent is to be transgressive.

"Uninspired" in what way? For the artist or the viewer? I've seen some stuff that looked like it was pieced together with very little skill but I have no idea if they were inspired at the time of tearing everything up or not.

Uninspired might be the wrong word. Maybe it's overly inspired? "I really like the way this guy works with black and white porn pics mixed with old black and white pictures of war atrocities/medical photos... I wonder if I could do something similar". I can often appreciate that if it's well executed but as you said, often it's just sloppy. I would imagine that if someone puts together a bunch of "offensive" images with seemingly no effort or ambition to make it aesthetically interesting, then they're just working on "transgressive" themes. Or maybe it's their "fetish"/"obsession" haha...
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cr
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« Reply #19 on: July 22, 2013, 04:30:45 PM »

Most are familiar with the mess I make already but there is some more at: www.bitewerks.blogspot.com and http://dieburninginchains.tumblr.com/

Last few pieces I've done (split with Coma Detox & split with SSRI) I've started using more original photography. I haven't done anything in awhile; I tend to do artwork when I have a release in the works. Got some ideas brewing now so may get back to work.

Do you take these photographs by yourself (and also 'develop' [don't know if that's the right word] them by yourself)? Or are these some found photographs? And if so, where do you go to find them? I'm very much interested in using original photgraphs by myself, but it's also kind of expensive, if you are not able to develop them in your own darkroom, so I rather stay with my cheap magazine cut-outs.
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bitewerksMTB
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« Reply #20 on: July 22, 2013, 06:34:28 PM »

I just take digital photos then print them out on a photo printer. Quality is pretty good, not much different than getting 35mm photos developed somewhere.

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cr
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« Reply #21 on: July 22, 2013, 08:06:46 PM »

Hah, yeah of course. Digital photo and printing it out... Didn't think about this possibility first.
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cr
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« Reply #22 on: August 18, 2013, 12:09:37 AM »

If someone's interested:
http://decrepit-troglodyte.tumblr.com/

As said, nothing special...but still, I like the process of putting these pieces together and then appreciate them on a very personal level.

More to follow, hopefully.
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cr
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« Reply #23 on: October 27, 2013, 08:43:05 PM »

Let's talk about the used materials. I myself just use newspapers, advertisments, and other things you get for free. So I try to take some of those fancy pictures and make something else out of it. Something that matches my tastes. But I think, for the future, I will try to take more original photographs. So, what do you use as raw material for your collage works?
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« Reply #24 on: October 28, 2013, 12:44:05 AM »

Let's talk about the used materials. I myself just use newspapers, advertisments, and other things you get for free. So I try to take some of those fancy pictures and make something else out of it. Something that matches my tastes. But I think, for the future, I will try to take more original photographs. So, what do you use as raw material for your collage works?

This is an interesting angle. Technic and execution, method and materials, artistic conecept. Here is something to finally brood upon. I don't care where I get my source material from as long as it corresponds with thematics and visuals esthetic. I find that most of the stuff one gets via junk mail etc often are of no use, but then again if one is working from an angle in where the concept is related to the source material - why not?! I prefer original material which can be processed and degraded through various methods. Your local library, your own family portrait book or seedy newsstand should have the most. Type of glue is another issue. Depends on where you want to aim, and what you'd like it to look like. Having textures from crumbled paper is always good in my book. Anyways, wallpaper glue is a good thing, but then it is preferable to work on hard boards, not paper, since paper tend to bend and misshape after drying. Anyways, working in the medium of collage or any other field I think it is important that there is a correlation between theme, materials, execution and esthetics. This makes the best results.   
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aischrolatreia
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« Reply #25 on: October 29, 2013, 03:10:07 AM »


I have developed much more of a filter when gathering material than I  used to. It's at the point that now I can tell immediately if it's something I could use. For a long time I would gather as much shit as possible, push it around and never commit, and lots of it still sits in folders. Medical books, textbooks, scientific american magazine, some porn, etc (no National geographic though).  Lately it's been equally about texture/how the stuff was printed just as much as it's about content. I'm mostly drawn to old papers/degraded artifacts of offset lithography. I usually go to junk/antique shops and dig around. Surface texture of ink and rough quality of paper plays a key role.  I photocopy things if i want them blown up or repeated, but often it is about making the most out of one piece of source material, everything carefully placed and doing its job. I'm also not really fond of the high contrast pure black on pure white in my own work. Sometimes however I will scan a collage and then appropriate it further.

Let's talk about the used materials. I myself just use newspapers, advertisments, and other things you get for free. So I try to take some of those fancy pictures and make something else out of it. Something that matches my tastes. But I think, for the future, I will try to take more original photographs. So, what do you use as raw material for your collage works?
Type of glue is another issue. Depends on where you want to aim, and what you'd like it to look like.

I find YES paste or PVA glue (basically elmer's) to be the best for my purposes. Everything lies flat and smooth, and lasts much longer than rubber cement.

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« Reply #26 on: November 11, 2013, 01:16:52 PM »

Durenstein!
Alternate Title    Victorian Blood Book; "To Amy Lester Garland--A legacy left in his lifetime for her future examination by her affectionate father"
Creator    Garland, John Bingley; Waugh, Evelyn, 1903-1966, former owner
Date    September 1, 1854 (inscribed)
Description    

Evelyn Waugh, whose manuscripts and 3,500-volume library are now at the Harry Ransom Center, University of Texas at Austin, was an inveterate collector of things Victorian (and well ahead of most of his contemporaries in this regard). Undoubtedly the single most curious object in the entire library is a large oblong folio decoupage book, often referred to as the "Victorian Blood Book."

Its decoupage was assembled from several hundred engravings, many taken from books of etchings by William Blake, as well as other illustrations from early nineteenth-century books. The principal motifs are natural (birds, animals, and especially snakes) and Christian (images of the crucifixion, scenes from the Bible, and crusaders). Drops of red india ink and extensive religious commentary have been added to many of the images. The craftsmanship is exquisite, and after more than 150 years, the adhesion of the decoupages is still perfect. The book bears an inscription by one John Bingley Garland to his daughter Amy and dated September 1, 1854: "A legacy left in his lifetime for her future examination by her affectionate father." Shortly afterwards, she married the Reverend Richard Pyper, so the album was probably an early wedding present.

A 2008 Maggs Brothers catalog includes a group of eccentric decoupages taken from one or more albums, described as being in the style of the Pre-Raphaelite artist Edward Burne-Jones. The style and content of these works, which feature groups of angels and blue or gold doves, are aptly described as "weird" and "rather elegant but very scary." They are unmistakably from the same hand as the Waugh book.

The existence of other such items suggests some kind of mass production, yet internal evidence indicates otherwise. John Bingley Garland was a prosperous Victorian businessman who moved to Newfoundland, went on to become speaker of its first Parliament, and returned to Stone Cottage in Dorset to end his days. A document still in the Garland family bears the same sanguinary ornamentation along with his signature. J. B. Garland's will mentions in passing "all the mythological paintings in the Library purchased by me in Italy"—perhaps a small clue to his artistic interests? Most importantly, the inscriptions in the dedication and the text are in the same hand. In recent years scholarship has focused on the significance of Victorian scrapbooking, which was almost exclusively the province of women. Scrapbooking was largely a means of organizing newspaper clippings and other information; the esthetic aspect was entirely secondary. In the lack of any information to the contrary, this apparently conventional paterfamilias must be regarded as the principal, if not the only, begetter of the decoupage, and if it was his alone, he must have spent hundreds of hours at the task.

How does one "read" such an enigmatic object? We understandably find elements of the grotesque and surreal. But our eyes view it differently from Victorian ones. As Garland's descendants have written, "our family doesn't refer to...'the Blood Book;' we refer to it as "Amy's Gift" and in no way see it as anything other than a precious reminder of the love of family and Our Lord."

The first plate contains a short table of contents and the title "Durenstein!" (Dürenstein, the Austrian castle in which Richard the Lionhearted was held captive). The title and the theme of many of the plates relates to the spiritual battles encountered by Christians along the path of life and the "blood" to Christian sacrifice. According to the Garland family, "it is full of symbols of both Human and Non-Human 'Crusaders and Protectors' of God and Christianity and most of the Verses, Quotes, etc are encouraging one to turn to God as our Saviour."
Language    English
Format    Collages; Scrapbooks
Extent    41 plates
Digital Object Type    Still Image
Physical Collection    Evelyn Waugh Collection
Collection Area    Manuscripts & Archives
Digital Collection    Evelyn Waugh's Victorian Blood Book
Collection Description    Evelyn Waugh materials at the Ransom Center include manuscripts as well as his personal library and art collection.
Repository    Harry Ransom Center, The University of Texas at Austin
Rights    The Harry Ransom Center does not own the rights for this item. It is the responsibility of the user to determine the rights status and secure permissions for the use of this item.
Identifier    Oversize Volume 1
Related Resource    Evelyn Waugh materials at the Ransom Center include manuscripts as well as his personal library and art collection.

http://hrc.contentdm.oclc.org/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15878coll16/id/46/rec/1#nav_top
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« Reply #27 on: November 11, 2013, 03:59:05 PM »

This looks amazing, thanks for posting!
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tiny_tove
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« Reply #28 on: November 11, 2013, 04:09:48 PM »

I am still speechless O_O. really impressed.
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CALIGULA031 - WERTHAM - FORESTA DI FERRO
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« Reply #29 on: November 11, 2013, 10:44:11 PM »

DURENSTEIN!!!

THANX TINY TOVE! This is high quality works!!! Made my day total!
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