Special Interest

GEAR / TECHNOLOGY => gear/tech/etc => Topic started by: Force Neurotic on January 13, 2017, 12:18:17 AM



Title: Alvin Lucier technique(s)
Post by: Force Neurotic on January 13, 2017, 12:18:17 AM
Had been thinking of Alvin Lucier's "I Am Sitting In A Room" composition a lot lately. For anyone unfamiliar, it's rather uninteresting; just Lucier's voice repeating a phrase - the engaging aspect is that each repetition of the sentence has been processed through being projected from a speaker back onto the tape, thus doubling the reverb effect of the room on his voice until what you hear is the room rather than the voice. My friend described it really well as "distilling sound."

For the unfamiliar:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fAxHlLK3Oyk
http://www.lovely.com/albumnotes/notes1013.html

Anyway, academic ramblings aside, this technique produces extremely interesting and always varied and unpredictable results that are wildly different depending on the source used. I've managed to somehow turn human singing voice into oscillating feedback-type sounds via a loop "Lucierized" back-and-forth.

Have been considering adding unusual room reverb to my vocals with this method. Perhaps even percussion if I can mic it properly.

Has anyone else tried this? Anyone know of recordings where techniques like this are used?


Title: Re: Alvin Lucier technique(s)
Post by: Potier on January 13, 2017, 01:16:54 AM
Not nearly the same - but you gotta think that Lucier was an inspiration:

https://www.discogs.com/Choi-Joonyong-I-Am-Scratching-A-CD-In-A-Room/release/2652800

The process of this recording was done by the following sequence:

record the sound of sinewave -> Part 0
make a new cdr with the sound of Part 0 and scratch the cdr -> Part 0 cdr
record the sound of Part 0 cdr played on a cd-player -> Part 1
make a new cdr with the sound of Part 1 and scratch the cdr -> Part 1 cdr
record the sound of Part 1 cdr played on a cd-player -> Part 2
make a new cdr with the sound of Part 2 and scratch the cdr -> Part 2 cdr
record the sound of Part 2 cdr played on a cd-player -> Part 3
make a new cdr with the sound of Part 3 and scratch the cdr -> Part 3 cdr
record the sound of Part 3 cdr played on a cd-player -> Part 4
make a new cdr with the sound of Part 4 and scratch the cdr -> Part 4 cdr
record the sound of Part 4 cdr played on a cd-player -> Part 5
make a new cdr with the sound of Part 5 and scratch the cdr -> Part 5 cdr
record the sound of Part 5 cdr played on a cd-player -> Part 6
make a new cdr with the sound of Part 6 and scratch the cdr -> Part 6 cdr
record the sound of Part 6 cdr played on a cd-player -> Part 7
make a new cdr with the sound of Part 7 and scratch the cdr -> Part 7 cdr
record the sound of Part 7 cdr played on a cd-player -> Part 8
make a new cdr with the sound of Part 8 and scratch the cdr -> Part 8 cdr
record the sound of Part 8 cdr played on a cd-player -> Part 9
This recording contains Part 1 ~ 9 in numerical order.


Title: Re: Alvin Lucier technique(s)
Post by: david lloyd jones on January 13, 2017, 06:36:07 PM
Had been thinking of Alvin Lucier's "I Am Sitting In A Room" composition a lot lately. For anyone unfamiliar, it's rather uninteresting; just Lucier's voice repeating a phrase - the engaging aspect is that each repetition of the sentence has been processed through being projected from a speaker back onto the tape, thus doubling the reverb effect of the room on his voice until what you hear is the room rather than the voice. My friend described it really well as "distilling sound."

For the unfamiliar:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fAxHlLK3Oyk
http://www.lovely.com/albumnotes/notes1013.html

Anyway, academic ramblings aside, this technique produces extremely interesting and always varied and unpredictable results that are wildly different depending on the source used. I've managed to somehow turn human singing voice into oscillating feedback-type sounds via a loop "Lucierized" back-and-forth.

Have been considering adding unusual room reverb to my vocals with this method. Perhaps even percussion if I can mic it properly.

Has anyone else tried this? Anyone know of recordings where techniques like this are used?

the band neurosis claimed this approach to do a remix of some DVD they put out on neurosis/relapse-they claimed the results were distilled neurosis genius rather than acoustics, but ok sounds if aware of origins.


Title: Re: Alvin Lucier technique(s)
Post by: diigitae on March 20, 2017, 02:13:35 PM
yasunao tone make sound on the first hand by paste some adhesive on cd on the other hand by alteration of mp3 format
it sound amazing i use some tricks of him sometimes