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Author Topic: NOISEXTRA - A podcast about noise  (Read 14761 times)
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Zeno Marx
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« Reply #75 on: April 02, 2020, 09:49:49 PM »

Talking anti-records...maybe worthy of a thread?

I believe it was Rubbish from the Troniks board that did some great anti-records.  Correct Troniks user?  If so, I remember this blue, thick paint one that stuck to memory.  Wish I had saved that image.  Anyone know what that was called?
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holy ghost
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« Reply #76 on: April 03, 2020, 05:33:50 PM »

I don’t always check out the regular ones but the recent Trashware with Jay from Curcuit Wound was fucking great.

“Tell me about your signal chain” is like a mild form of pornography for me....
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« Reply #77 on: April 03, 2020, 05:49:41 PM »

I don’t always check out the regular ones but

Likewise.  I'm just not a fan of this podcast in its regular format.  Sorry.  But when there are interesting guests in it's well worth it.  Chris Sienko's appearances have been great.  He has such a brilliant way of discussing noise and should be doing his own podcast really.  I've also appreciated episodes where artists get interviewed about their own work.  Seymour Glass, S&Q, Andy Bolus...more of that would be great.
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aububs
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« Reply #78 on: April 03, 2020, 09:06:07 PM »

chris sienko should definitely have his own podcast
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Zeno Marx
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« Reply #79 on: April 04, 2020, 08:05:47 PM »

RRR Taste Test episode...

One of those taboo subjects, but as MC touched on file sharing vs. tape dubbing.  Old argument.  Tape dubbing and mix tapes are one of the cornerstones of underground music.  Rehearsals, live, demos.  Borrowing records that you couldn't afford or find and making copies.  And basically how he differentiated the two was, as I understood it, the element of intimacy.  I find that interesting.  Having lived through both periods, I have to reach for a difference.  It's never been clearly different, though I definitely understand the argument.  Anyone else care to publicly share their opinion?  Not interested in an argument or judgment.
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« Reply #80 on: April 06, 2020, 11:30:54 AM »

RRR Taste Test episode...

One of those taboo subjects, but as MC touched on file sharing vs. tape dubbing.  Old argument.  Tape dubbing and mix tapes are one of the cornerstones of underground music.  Rehearsals, live, demos.  Borrowing records that you couldn't afford or find and making copies.  And basically how he differentiated the two was, as I understood it, the element of intimacy.  I find that interesting.  Having lived through both periods, I have to reach for a difference.  It's never been clearly different, though I definitely understand the argument.  Anyone else care to publicly share their opinion?  Not interested in an argument or judgment.

It's ultimately a totally different thing to tape dubbing/trading, but I think that file sharing has/had a certain character and feel to it that is often overlooked as its own significant cultural moment.  Despite the 'anything at anytime' availability of the internet we aren't just talking about users hoovering up everything they can find or searching out a specific album which will just be there instantly.  There was still lots of scope for discovery and exchange within it.  I certainly recall endless evenings using shitty P2P downloading programs and the same kind of experience as mentioned in the Taste Test episode of seeing all these weird band and artist names with no knowledge of what it all sounded like or where it came from other than it being bound up in some very general search term like 'weird', 'extreme', 'noise' etc etc.  The results would vary wildly, always depending on who was awake and sharing at a given time, you'd end up seeing particular items you'd never come across before and never seeing them again for this reason.  There was way less recourse to just go hunting on google for a web presence or info of all this stuff too back then and half the time you'd likely be downloading something straight off an artist themselves.  To this day I have tracks by some artists and still don't know who and what it really is.  Of course through some programs you could speak with them directly and discuss music.  I wouldn't use the word community here, at least not from my experience, but it was communicative for sure.  As I said, a different thing from tape trading and whatever it must have been like to make your major discoveries that way, and I'm only speaking from memory: it will have been different for many other people with better computers, internet connections and general smarts on how the shit worked, but my experience was one filled with mystery, ambiguity and intrigue and a massive part of formulating a taste for weird and noisy music.

This all refers to an older time for the internet and file sharing too...it was before music blogs filled with rips and viable online streaming sites, or databases or anything like that.  From a wider perspective I think people in my generation have a fairly overlooked experience of discovering music in the way these things get written about - it's either the days of all tape, vinyl and sometimes CD or the current world where everything is digital and online.  I never see anything said of the group in the middle who were too young for the tape trading and mail communication of the underground but were by no means raised in an online world, having gotten home internet access when they were already in their mid to late teens at a time when the online tools we have now were still very flawed or in some cases yet to be developed.  They discovered music through largely the same channels as everyone before them but the landscape was changing in ways people didn't fully appreciate and that crucial period where people really start to go nuts for music at a certain age took place in this complete middle point of what was then and what is now.  Even though people from this period are old enough to look back and memorialise it as a distinct time of its own, I doubt it can happen since so much developed so quickly and it was gone within a matter of a few years.  Maybe it's all for the best and wasn't anything that special overall, but it certainly existed and is largely not referenced.
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« Reply #81 on: April 08, 2020, 05:49:26 PM »

One of those taboo subjects, but as MC touched on file sharing vs. tape dubbing.  Old argument. 

In moments like these I go back to the roots. I mean, the roots for me. As a kid, at least in my town, the shit was available on the airwaves, on several radio stations. You'd maybe have to record hours upon hours of college radio or late night public broadcasting or whatever. But you would get shitloads of replayable awesomeness. To this day I have boxes upon boxes of replayable awesomeness.

But the point is. All your friends would STILL say- where the fuck do you get this shit? They wouldn't have a clue. Your parents wouldn't have a clue. No one would have a clue. It's on, every fucking night, or maybe every other fucking night, of at the least once a fucking night a week, but no one has a fucking clue because no one gives a flying fuck. Not a one could be arsed to seek the shit out like you were. To give the fuck, that may, under only the most ideal circumstances, fly.

And there's the dif. The percentage of persons who give a flying fuck. And then take yourself at that moment. Do you remember having spared a second thought for the persons whose giving of the flying fuck does not correspond to your own? Of course not. Because you would not have given a flying fuck for their not giving a flying fuck...

Uhh...

Sorry, getting carried away here. But suffice it to say, regardless of the source, an emphasis as far as curiosity on degree.

That degree is the difference. All caps on the THE.

(damn, this is some good beer)
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« Reply #82 on: April 09, 2020, 01:49:40 PM »

The early 2000's filesharing days of the internet were definitely an overlooked time for developing a more specialised or focused knowledge of music, or discovering things you wouldn't usually see in your local HMV. Word of mouth about Napster spread around my circle of friends at high/upper school and many a unique discovery was made, either intentionally or by accident. Sure, you could grab whatever nu-metal song you liked at the time for free, but what happens when you tried to download "Nirvana - Enter Sandman (Metallica cover).mp3" on your friend's recommendation? You get introduced to Wesley Willis and outsider music. Alternatively, you typed in swear words for a laugh and discovered the joys of Anal Cunt and their endlessly amusing/amusingly endless song titles which were perfectly suited to the P2P medium. And given that download speeds were grindingly slow on a pre-broadband modem and internet usage was then paid for by the minute, those sub-1MB downloads were quicker and easier to collect than a 4 minute song which might end up being broken after you'd finished downloading it 20 minutes later. Plus, the resulting download would be bloody funny to hear too.

My introduction to noise was via mp3.com where I first heard Whitehouse after reading about them in Bizarre magazine - when I listened to Dedicated To Peter Kurten (the obvious first choice), I wasn't sure if the sound I was hearing was broken because I was using a then-new-to-me codec called RealMedia. I had to listen to a few more tracks before I realised, wait, that actually IS what they actually sound like. Mind blown. I recall striking up a conversation with a stranger on Azureus or Morpheus or one of those successors to Napster that had a chat feature, and me casually mentioned discovering a band called Whitehouse which she probably wouldn't know about  - it turned out her boyfriend was a fan and had seen them play live recently. Mind blown again. I'm pretty sure the first full album download I made was Quality Time, copies of which I burned onto a CDr to hand to one of my English teachers at school, in return for some CDR compilations of early industrial from her partner (which is how I first heard TG and the sort). And because he worked as a studio engineer in a music college, that connection ended up resulting in him recording the first demo for the first (if only) band I was in at school.

Another thing about early filesharing was that pre-2005 or so, the internet was still considered an unsafe place (at least for younger people like me) for sending payment by electronic means, so downloading music just seemed like the natural conclusion to the whole computer/internet experience. Hackers stealing your card details seemed like a constant threat then, before PayPal or places like Amazon made things (seem) safer. Why bother with the stress when you can just get the music without the fluff? No wonder the music industry shit themselves at the thought of no-one paying excessive costs for physical media anymore! And what few things I was brave enough to buy in the early days of the internet were by still using traditional means like cheques, bank transfers, postal orders, ringing up someone's phone number to swap your card (or your parent's card) details or even the good old cash in the mail method (including asking your post office to exchange currency if you were paying dollars). The internet was just considered an extension of the phone book, and with that some extra effort was required to do most things. Hell, even waiting for your modem to connect or loading up web pages took a decent amount of time...

Anyways, I would argue that in the early days of filesharing there was plenty of intimacy given it was a new thing. Same goes for anything new before it becomes routine or gets co-opted. Early Myspace had intimacy, early Amazon had intimacy (how I miss the public Lists features reviewers would create for sharing music/book/film recommendations), YouTube had intimacy, Facebook had intimacy, this forum had intimacy. But people's attention spans can only stretch so far, and certainly the internet doesn't encourage a slower way of experiencing things in the long term. The fault probably lies with the medium itself, given people experience the internet spacially rather than durationally. You know the somewhat frozen limitations of a C90 mixtape cassette or a physical/hard collection - not so much a network of computers, data drives and the people using them that change and evolve constantly.
« Last Edit: April 09, 2020, 01:54:11 PM by theotherjohn » Logged
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« Reply #83 on: April 09, 2020, 07:12:09 PM »

depths of the internet is more much degenerate and. disgusting than even most graphic heyday of mail art/tape trading etc. i wasn't around back then but nowadays any 12 year old kid can watch another 12 year old ISIS kid shoot a bunch of people in HD quality. having access to internet by age 12-13 was totally crucial in my musical development; not having money, i'd never be able to afford say GISM lp or even steady stream of contemporary releases i might've wanted. also, internet does not necessarily make things more easily available; one still has to undertake to find it. file sharing blogs I loved, as they became a reliable and well-curated selection, many things would be downloaded just because they appeared on certain blog. nobody i knew at 18 years old or whatever would have personally recommended me Hijokaidan's "Modern," only out of insatiable desire for new sound and pursuit of strange corners did I come across such on my own.
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Bloated Slutbag
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« Reply #84 on: April 10, 2020, 04:29:14 PM »

depths of the internet is more much degenerate and. disgusting than even most graphic heyday of mail art/tape trading etc.

But not, and let’s make this clear, for want of trying! There was no internet the but there were the dial-up BBSes, principle purpose of which, at least from my vantage, was the dissemination every sick and twisted perversion possible (and several perversions probably actually not). No music, or none to my recollection of note, but oodles of smut, much of it gloriously degenerate. (Though obviously, in terms of the real here and now, nowhere near the nothing-left-to-the-imagination world of HD. One may try, but the technology would only go so far.)
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« Reply #85 on: April 10, 2020, 05:05:53 PM »

Before social media, before blogs, discogs and all that stuff, I recall... was it harshnoise.com or noise.com ? And from there one could get link to mr. STIMBOX website, where he had installed chat. Those days it was probably first time I got to talk to international noise fanatics. I don’t remember who all I found there. Death Squad, Stimbox himself, Sadio, Cloama, bunch of others I recall.
Also irc is another very early thing. I don’t remember ANY noise related channels, yet I remember chatting via irc with Cosmonauts Hail Satan and bunch of other guys. That is already in the 90’s. When pretty much nobody had internet home, but had to go to library or such place to get access.
I got my first email in 1997, as Lasse Marhaug insisted communication about Scandinavian Noise Manifesto would be faster if it would not be about sending letters between 3 artists.
Perhaps many messages above could be their own topic. That could be splitted out of this. Lets see a bit later!
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Zeno Marx
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« Reply #86 on: April 22, 2020, 10:53:09 PM »

Jazzed about something on Gruntsplatter.  Deserved.
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« Reply #87 on: May 09, 2020, 05:31:04 PM »

SPK "Information Overload Unit" with Canady is just beyond awesome, he should be a regular.
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Zeno Marx
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« Reply #88 on: May 22, 2020, 05:21:29 PM »

I haven't heard it once until I've heard it thrice definitely applies to the Robert Ashley episode.

http://www.ubu.com/sound/ashley.html

https://www.discogs.com/Various-Source-Music-Of-The-Avant-Garde-Source-Records-1-6-1968-1971/release/1657441
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« Reply #89 on: May 27, 2020, 04:52:18 PM »

I haven't heard it once until I've heard it thrice definitely applies to the Robert Ashley episode.

http://www.ubu.com/sound/ashley.html

https://www.discogs.com/Various-Source-Music-Of-The-Avant-Garde-Source-Records-1-6-1968-1971/release/1657441

Thank you very much!

One more Ubu link of considerable importance to the episode:

http://www.ubu.com/historical/wolgamot/index.html
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