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Author Topic: Sound Sample Resources and Suggestions  (Read 681 times)
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l.b.
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« Reply #15 on: September 19, 2019, 07:02:28 PM »

once again find myself offering a contrary perspective: I use lots of easily-available samples culled from the internet, because my samples usually are thematically related to to "concept" as it were. There's no obscure, cool story of me sampling congressman mo brooks talking about steve scalise getting shot on CNN, or orson welles on the dick cavett show. But they serve a narrative and conceptual function primarily. Sampling from hollywood movies is another thing...

edit: on tech side would strenuously recommend the free program AUDIO HIJACK for sampling from the computer
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Balor/SS1535
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« Reply #16 on: September 19, 2019, 10:33:51 PM »

once again find myself offering a contrary perspective: I use lots of easily-available samples culled from the internet, because my samples usually are thematically related to to "concept" as it were. There's no obscure, cool story of me sampling congressman mo brooks talking about steve scalise getting shot on CNN, or orson welles on the dick cavett show. But they serve a narrative and conceptual function primarily. Sampling from hollywood movies is another thing...

edit: on tech side would strenuously recommend the free program AUDIO HIJACK for sampling from the computer

I think that the secret is finding something that matches your intention with the project.  If it meshes well with what you intend to create and the noise tones that are used, then it shouldn't be problematic whether the sample is easy to identify/find or not.  The result would probably be even better in spite of it due to the conceptual integrity of the work taken as a whole.  There is no point in being obscure simply for the sake of obscurity.
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Foss
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« Reply #17 on: September 19, 2019, 11:21:43 PM »

I have always liked to go on physical record hunting missions, and besides finding actual good records there is the hunt to find really obscure stuff to sample. I like to keep a physical archive of tapes and lps with different stuff that can be used on occation. Same goes for movie/soundtrack samples. Having been involved in making beats for some time, also way before every movie was online, there was always a quest of finding killer loops from old movies. Even back when i first saw Cannibal Holocaust on some dusty vhs for the first time the song was so obvious a great sample from an infamous that someone for sure would have lifted it before. Flea markets and garage sales forever!
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theworldisawarfilm
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« Reply #18 on: September 20, 2019, 03:57:50 PM »


There is no point in being obscure simply for the sake of obscurity.


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Force Neurotic
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« Reply #19 on: September 20, 2019, 04:39:04 PM »

You can sort of tell who's willing to work hard at these sorts of things versus who's lazier based on their justifications. Abundance in the digital age is convenient yet clearly expedites and therefore cheapens "the search." Spending time finding, acquiring and using the found sound has a more personal and relevant function in one's worl when more effort and physical energy is required.  Give me home recorded tapes from thrift stores and vhs copies of old documentaries any day over somebody's YouTube channel. You can find some media-exploited surviving victim of some predator crying on camera for your PE project or whatever quite easily, but instead you might look at secondhand shops for tapes of trauma counseling sessions. If you're supposedly dedicated to your craft/art, the work involved should reflect that.
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deutscheasphalt
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« Reply #20 on: September 20, 2019, 05:09:57 PM »

[...]work hard at these sorts of things versus who's lazier [...] cheapens "the search." [...] more effort and physical energy
 
Some weird value statements here - as if the defining factor of a good recording was how much energy you spent on it...

Give me home recorded tapes from thrift stores and vhs copies of old documentaries any day over somebody's YouTube channel. You can find some media-exploited surviving victim of some predator crying on camera for your PE project or whatever quite easily, but instead you might look at secondhand shops for tapes of trauma counseling sessions. If you're supposedly dedicated to your craft/art, the work involved should reflect that.

I generally agree that it's more likely to find "better" material for conceptual use by obtaining recordings as close to the source of matter as possible. Material that is not heavily pre-selected as you would expect it from many internet sources and that requires to really dig in and look for appropriate samples (an own unique recording of a witnessed counselling session might be superior to your example for instance).
However you make this sound so dismissive. If the output is the same, the source for the used sample material is absolutely irrelevant.
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Force Neurotic
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« Reply #21 on: September 20, 2019, 05:32:40 PM »

I get what you mean, and I guess it's a pretty opinionated point of view, but it's honestly how I feel. Hey, if someone whose work I love can find something with ease and expediency, more power to them. When it comes to what I do, though, I have serious regrets re: taking the easy route in past projects and such. I just think that ultimately if I'm to present something to an audience, it should be a labor of love and fussed over until as close to my vision as it can get. This means being neurotic about every detail.
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Balor/SS1535
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« Reply #22 on: September 20, 2019, 07:27:56 PM »

You can sort of tell who's willing to work hard at these sorts of things versus who's lazier based on their justifications. Abundance in the digital age is convenient yet clearly expedites and therefore cheapens "the search." Spending time finding, acquiring and using the found sound has a more personal and relevant function in one's worl when more effort and physical energy is required.  Give me home recorded tapes from thrift stores and vhs copies of old documentaries any day over somebody's YouTube channel. You can find some media-exploited surviving victim of some predator crying on camera for your PE project or whatever quite easily, but instead you might look at secondhand shops for tapes of trauma counseling sessions. If you're supposedly dedicated to your craft/art, the work involved should reflect that.

I am not so sure that just because a sample was puled from the internet that the search for it was necessarily easier or quicker.  As GEWALTMONOPOL suggested above, the sheer volume of digital material often means that the process of finding the perfect sample is often long and difficult.
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