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Author Topic: What are you reading  (Read 207674 times)
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Yohe
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« Reply #705 on: May 09, 2018, 07:14:53 PM »

I'm heavily into fantasy novels lately. Currently reading the third book of the Mistborn series by Brandon Sanderson. That man's a genius. Love his books.
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holy ghost
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« Reply #706 on: May 14, 2018, 12:41:46 AM »

I'm heavily into fantasy novels lately. Currently reading the third book of the Mistborn series by Brandon Sanderson. That man's a genius. Love his books.

Haven't read those but the Stormlight Archive is so fucking great. Eagerly awaiting #3 to arrive in paperback this fall.

Currently reading The Looming tower: Al-Qaeda and the Road to 9/11, my wife picked it up for me on a whim and I'm loving it.

Just finished book 1 of The Expanse, it's a pretty easy read but very entertaining. I inhaled it in a week which is pretty good for me considering how little time I have to sit and read.
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aububs
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« Reply #707 on: May 14, 2018, 09:29:03 PM »

finished gene wolfe's briah cycle recently

mind blowing

also got through 2666 which i loved and will read again
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Frataxin
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« Reply #708 on: May 14, 2018, 10:30:36 PM »

Currently, I'm reading The Sluts by Dennis Cooper, someone recommended it to me. It's fantastic, and hilarious in the worst way, which is what I like.
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« Reply #709 on: May 20, 2018, 03:54:10 PM »

Too Far From Home: Selected Writings of Paul Bowles, ed. Daniel Halperin (Ecco, 1993)
          More well-known for his music in some circles (including having some of his recordings put out under erroneous credit to Brion Gysin!), Paul Bowles was one of those expatriate authors to live a more traveled and decadent life before it was fashionable, influencing Burroughs and the Beat era - but being far superior in every way, literary and lifestyle, through and through; Burroughs couldn't do under the influence of heroin what this guy did with just a little hash. This collection contains a novella, some fiction stories, novel excerpts, some non-fiction, and an interview. So far I've only read the short stories and started the novella (published posthumously), but I really can say without hyperbole this guy's work is much better than the great majority of so-called "transgressive" authors, with a couple exceptions. Gorgeous imagery, razor-sharp subtlety and wit, a sort of magical lyricism, and of course extremely brutal and often sudden violence. You can get his reading "A Hundred Camels in the Courtyard" or his music "The Pool K III" from Dom America to accompany this fine tome or instead pair it with anything by Amph, Organum, or maybe even Randy Greif and you'll do just fine.

A superb and accomplished scribe, thanks for the reminder.
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« Reply #710 on: June 08, 2018, 10:54:19 PM »

Bought some books the last week, already browsed through some pages here and there. Looking forward to read them with more focus:

Ernst Jünger: In Stahlgewittern (Storm of Steel)
Reinhard Falter: Ludwig Klages
Franz Wegener: Alfred Schuler - Der letzte deutsche Katharer
Ernst von Salomon: Die Geächteten (The Outlaws)
Georg Trakl: Complete Poems
Leonora Carrington: The house of fear; and The Hearing Trumpet
...and also an art book with some of her paintings called Surrealism, Alchemy and Art by Susan L. Aberth
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Kayandah
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« Reply #711 on: June 19, 2018, 12:46:01 PM »

A History of Violence by Oscar Martinez
Not keen on the title which misleads, but this is an excellent collection of articles he wrote about the goings on in Central America, namely El Salvador, Guatemala and Honduras. My readings on the drug trade in Mexico indicated that its seriously messed up in Central america, this book provides an honest portrayal as he interviews narcos, corrupt politicians, policemen and the poor people who suffer. Obviously when things are this endemically corrupt there are no solutions.
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holy ghost
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« Reply #712 on: June 30, 2018, 03:54:55 PM »

I’m reading Sapiens: A Brief History of Humankind by Yuval Noah Harari and really enjoying it. Basically tracing the history of human evolution, he’s got a great writing style and the book is genuinely interesting. 
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Kim V
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« Reply #713 on: July 02, 2018, 07:01:49 PM »

Finally finished "America's War for the Greater Middle East" by Andrew J. Bacevich and now started something entirely different, Blood Meridian by Cormac McCarthy
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Harvest
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« Reply #714 on: July 02, 2018, 07:07:31 PM »

Blood Meridian by Cormac McCarthy

chapter 10 is one of the greatest moments in american literature.
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Force Neurotic
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« Reply #715 on: July 10, 2018, 08:41:09 PM »

Philip Best “Captagon” (Amphetamine Sulphate, 2017)
        Loose but still coherent semi-narrative piece that seems to follow a somewhat “post-apocalyptic” scenario with references to lots of real-world crime cases, news stories, etc. Originally I was focused on how the style reminds me of Kurt Vonnegut, Kathy Acker and Hubert Selby Jr., but mostly I'm amazed with how the entire concept/technique reminds me of Henry Darger – a really unique mix of violence and vulnerability with an almost-defined worldview (of sorts), should remind anyone who was ever a teen or adolescent of their formative years. This is pretty much my first experience with Best's fiction. So far, I like it. I'm hesitant to get too collegiate about things, but I think there's some mockery of consumerism and capitalism, or at least the hyperactive pace of the modern world going on here – like Genocide Organ/Grey Wolves under the influence of some experimental psychedelic/stimulant.

Simon Morris “Creepshots” (Amphetamine Sulphate, 2017)
         Although I really enjoyed Comsumer Guide, this might be my favorite work by the author so far. He'd probably find the idea pretty lame, but this would make good spoken-word recordings; the convergence of influences, sources, and subjects could serve as engaging listening as well as the incredibly moving reading as it is. I'm fairly sure I read a draft of this prior to publication, which had some sections I'm sad to have noticed were left out. The fairly “dystopian” sections dealing with government-funded arts programs  juxtaposed with the problem of homelessness seems to be continued from the aforementioned CG and is something I hope he continues to do; any cursory news search could yield plenty of source material. What I like is that some sections are dispassionate, others full of despair, and yet the text seems to end on something of a “high note” or at least a sense of closure. The sign-off at the end among other parts made me laugh out loud. Excellent stuff with few available comparisons. Has this sort of quick, efficient quality which I feel reflects both the “medicated” honesty of the author as well as the increasingly-tiny (and narcissistic) attention span of people in general, “Millenials” or otherwise. Very gifted writer.

Simon Morris “Civil War” (Amphetamine Sulphate, 2018)
         I'm certainly no fan of GNR, but I still find the analysis going on here pretty clever: before I even opened the book, I remebered this quote, something along the lines of “When people say Axl Rose is a screaming two-year-old, they're right,” and of course I'm pretty sure the article or interview that's from is referenced here. I suppose I can relate because I have similar self-aware obsessions with certain other so-called artists whom many would see as unworthy of whatever insane praise I might heap on them, and it's not like you don't realize they're a crazy loser. Anyway, this book also seems to be about a certain kind of romantic experience I can really relate to, the phrase “playground psychotics” (to borrow from Frank Zappa) came to mind. I've had many of these, where the intensity and trouble you've gotten yourself (and the other person) into is only slowly revealed. Probably why I love Hitchcock films. Morris is one of two or three writers whose words have made me nauseous because I could relate too much.

Duncan Harrison “Something Approaching Zero” (self-published, 2018?)
        Really good, honest, somewhat “existential” and sort of bluntly efficient and cynical/pessimistic deconstruction stuff which manages not to be a downer tract in a whiny voice – rather the opposite. Pretty Neizschean, if I must say, with a dark humor that's somehow not at all bitter. I could see Amphetamine Sulphate publishing work from this author as it'd fit in quite well (seriously, please do). Has a very easygoing style that suggests the author is capable of either coherent philosophical/psychological analysis or great prose fiction equally. Brings to mind some of Bret Easton Ellis' classier moments if I had to squeeze out a comparison.
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« Reply #716 on: July 10, 2018, 10:32:22 PM »

Philip Best “Captagon” (Amphetamine Sulphate, 2017)
Simon Morris “Creepshots” (Amphetamine Sulphate, 2017)

There we some great parts in both of these, especially in Captagon. Haven't finished the entire Amphetamine Sulphate batch yet but the reprint of Alex Binnie's 'Scum' is by far my favourite of the lot so far.

In the middle of JG Ballard's 'High Rise' at the moment.
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