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Author Topic: What are you reading  (Read 291257 times)
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FreakAnimalFinland
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« Reply #225 on: May 02, 2013, 06:58:37 AM »

Standing In Two Circles, and though I've read many of the articles elsewhere, I must say that writing is NOT Mr. Rice's forte. The article on Savitri Devi has at least four paragraphs that lead with "Whether you love her or hate her, agree or disagree..." and leaves you feeling like you've just read a schoolboy's book report.

Yep, I did some critical comments of his other book some pages ago. He is ok writer, when themes are of your interest. That's very common thing. When you settle for underground zine level, where exceptional interests rules over skill as author...

I recommend to check out:
Hitler's Priestess: Savitri Devi, the Hindu-Aryan Myth and Neo-Nazism
by Nicholas Goodrick-Clarke. Biography of Savitri Devi with tons of nice information of just about anything related to matter.
New York University Press, 1998. Widely available for quite cheap prices.
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« Reply #226 on: May 21, 2013, 07:54:38 PM »

Not reading, but just noticed this book. Seems to be quite weird/interesting.

David Rothenberg Bug Music: How Insects Gave Us Rhythm and Noise

In the spring of 2013 the cicadas in the Northeastern United States will yet again emerge from their seventeen-year cycle—the longest gestation period of any animal. Those who experience this great sonic invasion compare their sense of wonder to the arrival of a comet or a solar eclipse. This unending rhythmic cycle is just one unique example of how the pulse and noise of insects has taught humans the meaning of rhythm, from the whirr of a cricket’s wings to this unfathomable and exact seventeen-year beat.

In listening to cicadas, as well as other humming, clicking, and thrumming insects, Bug Music is the first book to consider the radical notion that we humans got our idea of rhythm, synchronization, and dance from the world of insect sounds that surrounded our species over the millions of years over which we evolved. Completing the trilogy he began with Why Birds Sing and Thousand Mile Song, David Rothenberg explores a unique part of our relationship with nature and sound—the music of insects that has provided a soundtrack for humanity throughout the history of our species. Bug Music continues Rothenberg’s in-depth research and spirited writing on the relationship between human and animal music, and it follows him as he explores insect influences in classical and modern music, plays his saxophone with crickets and other insects, and confers with researchers and scientists nationwide.

This engaging and thought-provoking book challenges our understanding of our place in nature and our relationship to the creatures surrounding us, and makes a passionate case for the interconnectedness of species.
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secondplanet
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« Reply #227 on: May 21, 2013, 11:18:42 PM »

Not reading, but just noticed this book. Seems to be quite weird/interesting.

David Rothenberg Bug Music: How Insects Gave Us Rhythm and Noise

In the spring of 2013 the cicadas in the Northeastern United States will yet again emerge from their seventeen-year cycle—the longest gestation period of any animal. Those who experience this great sonic invasion compare their sense of wonder to the arrival of a comet or a solar eclipse. This unending rhythmic cycle is just one unique example of how the pulse and noise of insects has taught humans the meaning of rhythm, from the whirr of a cricket’s wings to this unfathomable and exact seventeen-year beat.

In listening to cicadas, as well as other humming, clicking, and thrumming insects, Bug Music is the first book to consider the radical notion that we humans got our idea of rhythm, synchronization, and dance from the world of insect sounds that surrounded our species over the millions of years over which we evolved. Completing the trilogy he began with Why Birds Sing and Thousand Mile Song, David Rothenberg explores a unique part of our relationship with nature and sound—the music of insects that has provided a soundtrack for humanity throughout the history of our species. Bug Music continues Rothenberg’s in-depth research and spirited writing on the relationship between human and animal music, and it follows him as he explores insect influences in classical and modern music, plays his saxophone with crickets and other insects, and confers with researchers and scientists nationwide.

This engaging and thought-provoking book challenges our understanding of our place in nature and our relationship to the creatures surrounding us, and makes a passionate case for the interconnectedness of species.

If you haven't already, look up Radiolab's podcast interviewing David Rothenberg and talking about cicada sounds, it's great. Also, the guy apparently did an experiment where he transmitted his clarinet live through an underwater speaker over to a whale and managed to get recordings of the whale trying to mimic the sounds.
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« Reply #228 on: May 24, 2013, 09:08:21 PM »

Haven't read it yet but I found Alan Dean Foster's novelization of John Carpenter's THE THING!

Currently reading a crime novel called "Vengeance Road" written by Rick Mofina.

I keep a list of books I've read so over the last couple of months: "American Sniper" by Chris Kyle; "Her Last Scream" by J.A. Kerley; "The Fall" by Guillermo del Toro & Chuck Hogan;  "Unwanted" by Kristina Ohlsson;  "Captured" by Neil Cross;  "Witchspell" by Guy N. Smith plus a 2-in-1 novel called "Transgressions" with Lawrence Block & Jeff Deaver or Beaver, I can't read my scribbling...
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« Reply #229 on: May 25, 2013, 10:01:03 AM »

Alain de Benoist - Beyond human rights - critique of human rights. Interesting insights, but for me, as a non native English speaker without any background in philosophy, it's rather difficult reading.
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ELETTRONICA RADICALE EDIZIONI


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« Reply #230 on: May 29, 2013, 10:59:17 PM »

not reading, but waiting for this: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2332670/American-WWII-GIs-dangerous-sex-crazed-rapists-French-feared-Germans-explosive-book-claims.html#ixzz2UiOu1Vqu
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Bleak Existence
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« Reply #231 on: June 05, 2013, 12:10:07 AM »

The Unabomber Manifesto
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« Reply #232 on: June 05, 2013, 01:16:59 AM »

Heart of Darkness


and i downloaded the koran, that should be an interesting read
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FreakAnimalFinland
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« Reply #233 on: June 05, 2013, 07:46:58 PM »

and i downloaded the koran, that should be an interesting read

Let me know when you've finished ;)

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« Reply #234 on: June 06, 2013, 08:23:29 AM »

Peter Nilsson - Messias med träbenet
Yukio Mishima - Death in midsummer and other stories

Two collections of short stories. I guess everyone knows about Mishima (amazing stuff, as expected). Peter Nilsson on the other hand... doubt he's been translated to any greater extent. This is a fantastic pile of stories (Messiah with the wooden leg, or something like that), and just like Mishima his stories, at least in this volume, revolves around death. From a different angle though. Kinda folklorish, but without being corny. Rather unsettling at times actually.
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simulacrum
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« Reply #235 on: June 06, 2013, 12:33:01 PM »

I'll need to check out Mishima's short stories eventually. I've read seven of his novels, and actually just finished Temple of the Golden Pavilion no more than twenty minutes ago.

I'm torn between what I'm reading next. Maybe Kafka's Amerika, The Necklace and Other Stories by Maupassant or a collection of Moliere's plays (which I'm leaning toward since I enjoyed The Misanthrope).
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vyrixin
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« Reply #236 on: June 06, 2013, 11:39:30 PM »

I often find myself coming back to the Amok Journal - http://www.amazon.com/books/dp/187892303X

It has essays and reports about self-mutilation, auto-erotic fatalities, trepanning, cargo cults etc. There are some great first-hand accounts of self-emasculation in there as well.
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simulacrum
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« Reply #237 on: June 07, 2013, 12:50:06 AM »

I often find myself coming back to the Amok Journal - http://www.amazon.com/books/dp/187892303X

It has essays and reports about self-mutilation, auto-erotic fatalities, trepanning, cargo cults etc. There are some great first-hand accounts of self-emasculation in there as well.

Thanks for posting. That seems very interesting. I put it on my wish list.

Anyway, I opted for this history of Surrealism over Moliere's plays:
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« Reply #238 on: June 09, 2013, 02:21:28 PM »

After not reading any kind of fiction books, but only work-related, research, scientific etc. I stumbled upon William Hope Hodgson's - The House on the Borderland. (thanks to A. Brandal's dedication of some tape or so to this book). Wow. Was it my longing for the good read or is this book is really fantastic. It's been years and years since I've read something with such a big pleasure. Perhaps Lovecraft is also worth trying? For some reason I was always sceptic about Lovecraft's creations, but if he manages to reach such intense and beauty of cosmic horror as W. H. Hodgson, I guess it's worth a try.
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youngnosh
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« Reply #239 on: June 09, 2013, 02:52:25 PM »

The Rest Is Propaganda - Steve Ignorant
It's interesting to see how he became the man he is (or was) and what life was like to grow up within the working class in the last generation where class was so clear cut and easily defined.
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