Special Interest
November 28, 2022, 02:54:14 PM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
News:
 
   Home   Help Login Register  

Pages: 1 [2]
  Print  
Author Topic: Radical exhibitions  (Read 29591 times)
0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.
ConcreteMascara
SI Staff
Overkill user
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 1582



WWW
« Reply #15 on: February 16, 2010, 03:57:36 AM »

This is old news but I'm curious, did anyone make it to the Francis Bacon exhibit at the Tate Modern from Sep. 08 to Jan 09? I had a friend who said it was really excellent, but didn't tell me much more.
Logged

alpharmania
Guest
« Reply #16 on: February 16, 2010, 11:21:37 AM »

I work nowadays at a local art gallery. The exhibition we have right now is called Likboden. A collective of three artists that work in a corpse storage room from old mental hospital Sidsjön in Sundsvall. Field recordings for "Kodon" tape with Alfarmania was done there, but then it was recently abandoned and not occupied by artists....
one of the artists have narcolepsia and does strange drawings that reminds me about morbid art brut adaption of tove jansson. second artist does work much influenced by francis bacon... grotesque sexual scenes depictured in surreal way... third provided huge portrait of caligula with bleeding eyes, drawings of bestiality acts + video art based on mishimas de sade and their own footage from S21 death camp in cambodia... etc... nothing really groundbreaking but nice to see such work being exposed in small town in northern sweden.
Logged
tiny_tove
Overkill user
******
Offline Offline

Posts: 2801


ELETTRONICA RADICALE EDIZIONI


WWW
« Reply #17 on: February 22, 2010, 11:05:06 AM »

Oleg Kulik -


 
Never heard of him until this Saturday. His work features of nice depressive black and white pictures of bestiality with him performing (or acting) sex with a variety of animals in rural landscapes, definitely not "classy", looking often as rough amateur porn with depressive black and white. There are also some grotesque cut-ups featuring his vision of modern day russia with strong content of animals relation and sex. Some looks grim, other fascinating. Reminded me Otto Muhel less geeky stuff although we are definitely in those fields.
His whole work seems to be centered around breaking barriers of specism in a way most animal activists would shit in their pants to consider.
Nice videos of him naked acting like a dog in a box and other very industrial looking video cut-ups of experiments, ecc.

I also enjoyed the less extreme stuff (as in picture).
Logged

CALIGULA031 - WERTHAM - FORESTA DI FERRO
instagram: @ANTICITIZEN
http://elettronicaradicale.bandcamp.com
alpharmania
Guest
« Reply #18 on: February 22, 2010, 08:47:17 PM »

I remember an exhibition of Oleg from maybe ten years ago in Stockholm where he performed naked chained as a dog and assaulting & biting those who didn't take the warning signs seriously. I am not sure if I am mixing up later information but I think some swedish neo-nazis (most likely Swedish Resistance Movement) vandalized that or some of his later exhibitions....
Logged
tiny_tove
Overkill user
******
Offline Offline

Posts: 2801


ELETTRONICA RADICALE EDIZIONI


WWW
« Reply #19 on: February 22, 2010, 09:06:37 PM »

there was extensive video footage of that performance at the exhibition in Milan.
Logged

CALIGULA031 - WERTHAM - FORESTA DI FERRO
instagram: @ANTICITIZEN
http://elettronicaradicale.bandcamp.com
Nil By Mouth
Heavy user
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 267



« Reply #20 on: March 02, 2010, 05:14:34 PM »

http://www.repubblica.it/spettacoli-e-cultura/2010/03/02/foto/mostra_russia-2482057/1/

Sorry for the italian language but I don't have found nothing in english. However, it's an exhibitions in St. Peterburg about crime lifes, autopsy etc.
Logged
tiny_tove
Overkill user
******
Offline Offline

Posts: 2801


ELETTRONICA RADICALE EDIZIONI


WWW
« Reply #21 on: March 05, 2010, 10:51:15 AM »

More infos regarding Lombroso's museum from Atlas Obscura

 Cesare Lombroso's Museum of Criminal Anthropology

Once only open to academics, "Lombroso's Museum" has opened its doors to the public revealing the astonishing collection of an infamous criminologist




As the criminologist Cesare Lombroso examined the skull of the autopsied the body of Giuseppe Villela, the notorious Italian criminal he had just dissected, he discovered a cranial anomaly known as a “median occipital fossette." Lombroso was suddenly overtaken by flash of insight. As he would write many years later

“The sight of that fossette suddenly appeared to me like a broad plain beneath an infinite horizon, the nature of the criminal was illuminated, he must have reproduced in our day the traits of primitive man going back as far as the carnivores.”

What Lombroso felt he had discovered would become his legacy and known throughout the world as the "Italian school of criminology." Lombroso felt that he now understood the true 'scientific' nature of crime and criminals. Put simply, according to Lombroso you didn't learn to become a criminal, you were born to become one. Also called "biological determinism," Lombroso's theory of "anthropological criminology" and the upbeat sounding "positivist criminology" was that criminals were a kind of evolutionary throwback, physically de-evolved, and unfortunately for them they couldn't change because it was part of their biology.

Physical characteristics tied to being a "natural born criminal" were many and included large jaws, forward projection of jaw, low sloping foreheads, high cheekbones, flattened or upturned nose, handle-shaped ears, large chins, hawk-like noses or fleshy lips, hard shifty eyes, scanty beard or baldness, insensitivity to pain and long arms.

Lombroso also believed that race was an indicator of evolution with blacks being the least evolved and whites being the most evolved, or in his words "only we white people have reached the ultimate symmetry of bodily form." Interestingly despite these beliefs (which it should be added were commonly held at the time) Lombroso was not a particularly virulent man and was a believer in reform rather than punishment, and was against capital punishment.

As part of his studies Lombroso collected numerous specimens both biological such as numerous skulls for study, but also weapons used in crimes and other criminological relics. In 1892 Lombroso opened a museum in Turin (narrowly escaping having his collection seized by Rome) bragging "our school has attracted and convinced the best scientists in Europe who did not disdain to send us, as proof of their support, the most valuable documents in their collections.”

Lomborso was a lifelong collector described by his daughter as “Although untidy and neglectful of what he possessed, Lombroso was a born collector – while he walked, while he talked, while he was engaged in discussion; in town, in the country, in court, in prison, on his travels, he was always studying something that no one could see, thus amassing or buying a wealth of curiosities, which at the time no one, not even he himself, could have placed a value on...”

Among the collections he acquired for the museum are hundreds of skulls of soldiers and civilians, natives from 'far-off lands' as well as those of criminals and madmen, dozens of complete skeletons, brains, and wax models of "natural criminals" as well as "drawings, photos, criminal evidence, anatomical sections of "madmen and criminals" and work produced by criminals in the last century, the Gallows of Turin, which were in use until the city's final hanging in 1865 and the possessions of a man known as White Stag, a renowned impostor who convinced Europe he was a great Native American chief."

The collection is topped off by the head of Lombroso himself, "perfectly preserved in a glass chamber."

See an error? Know more? Edit this place.
Logged

CALIGULA031 - WERTHAM - FORESTA DI FERRO
instagram: @ANTICITIZEN
http://elettronicaradicale.bandcamp.com
tiny_tove
Overkill user
******
Offline Offline

Posts: 2801


ELETTRONICA RADICALE EDIZIONI


WWW
« Reply #22 on: July 09, 2010, 04:54:57 PM »

Cesare Inzerillo - The dead class

In Salemi - Sicily.

He's been working as scenographer for Cipri' & Maresco, author of most radical/grotesque Italian cults "Toto' who lived twice" , "The Uncle from Brooklyn" and "Cagliostro returns"

His work is inspired by the Cappuccini father's crypts in Palermo.

http://mmedia.kataweb.it/foto/6457662/1/cesare-inzerillo





Logged

CALIGULA031 - WERTHAM - FORESTA DI FERRO
instagram: @ANTICITIZEN
http://elettronicaradicale.bandcamp.com
tiny_tove
Overkill user
******
Offline Offline

Posts: 2801


ELETTRONICA RADICALE EDIZIONI


WWW
« Reply #23 on: November 15, 2010, 09:53:54 AM »

Araki's exhibition in Lugano, very nice and well organize, a personal insight on life-sex-death, featuring plenty of recent works, a whole wall of polaroid stills and the tragic developement of his love life.
I didn't buy the catalogue since it was too big and I don't have such large shelf at home.
Logged

CALIGULA031 - WERTHAM - FORESTA DI FERRO
instagram: @ANTICITIZEN
http://elettronicaradicale.bandcamp.com
tiny_tove
Overkill user
******
Offline Offline

Posts: 2801


ELETTRONICA RADICALE EDIZIONI


WWW
« Reply #24 on: January 18, 2011, 05:56:16 PM »

best exhib I have seen in years.

it looked as if it was organised by us:

http://we-make-money-not-art.com/archives/2010/11/disquieting-images.php
Logged

CALIGULA031 - WERTHAM - FORESTA DI FERRO
instagram: @ANTICITIZEN
http://elettronicaradicale.bandcamp.com
ironfistofthesun
Guest
« Reply #25 on: January 19, 2011, 09:45:12 PM »

the strangest place in the uk

http://www.littledeanjail.com/default.asp
Logged
tiny_tove
Overkill user
******
Offline Offline

Posts: 2801


ELETTRONICA RADICALE EDIZIONI


WWW
« Reply #26 on: February 03, 2011, 11:09:13 AM »

http://www.fubiz.net/2011/01/13/3d-paintings-on-glass/

genious
Logged

CALIGULA031 - WERTHAM - FORESTA DI FERRO
instagram: @ANTICITIZEN
http://elettronicaradicale.bandcamp.com
Pages: 1 [2]
  Print  
 
Jump to:  


Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.21 | SMF © 2015, Simple Machines Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!
Page created in 0.185 seconds with 19 queries.