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Author Topic: WHITE CENTIPEDE NOISE PODCAST  (Read 81848 times)
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« Reply #180 on: March 17, 2022, 12:54:12 AM »

NOISE TV is definitely the goal. It's been surprisingly hard to get folks to submit content along the lines of video/multimedia. If anyone has any interest in submitting something or suggestions, feel free to get in touch.
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« Reply #181 on: March 17, 2022, 07:54:33 AM »

One easy content suggestion.

I am normally, pretty much 100% uninterested in "unboxing videos".
In context of noise, if there was someone to make videos of... lets say MSBR lathe 7"s or such. Perhaps Death Squad tapes, or something similar noise special packaging, which don't really come out ideally from photos, I would probably change my mind about unboxing videos, haha! I was just selling my duplicate copy of Hands To double LP on Petri Supply, and opening both copies I had, just to make sure I keep the.. better. What a horrible moment, having to figure out which one would have to go. Same album. Theoretically same covers... but not! As soon as you start actually opening it, going through prints, textures, colors and all that. It really makes you want to keep both. Just knowing there there must be multiple other great versions, so you do not really need it. However, if someone would make video of what their Petri Supply handmade packages look like, with perhaps playing little noise on background, I'd consider it worth of 5 mins in in some sort of NoiseTV episode. I'd take look on any G.R.O.S.S., old Tesco, Taint Entertainment, Slogun, etc. All it needs is guy who knows what kind of lights to use and what angle will make you see the goodies you're never going to find...  This is far more interesting "unboxing" that all those new mass products people seem to unbox.


(Only limitations of platform is a bit sucky. If you can't unbox Smell & Quim / Macronympha 7", you know platform ain't ideal for noise. In recent weeks even stuff like MO*TE CD box video trailer was considered adults only. Formerly one was used to situation where picture of antique statue/sculpture is enough to be too pornographic or violent, but now its been videos where is literally zero about of disagreable content.)
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« Reply #182 on: March 21, 2022, 07:16:34 PM »

Out now! Episode 19 with Sam McKinlay of THE RITA!

https://youtu.be/aD8FkfQ-7Jg
https://youtu.be/aD8FkfQ-7Jg
https://youtu.be/aD8FkfQ-7Jg
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« Reply #183 on: March 22, 2022, 10:40:51 AM »

Absolute excellent episode! Of course, one can't expect that everybody would be so casual, ready to talk in absolute detail, and also funny. I'd suppose for most it is slightly challenging situation to be in front of webcam, sweating while thing what the hell should be said, what wouldn't be just.. trivial. Mr. McKinlay certainly is the key harsh noise masters of our times, for pushing things into formerly unheard level of fanaticism for the detail.

It is quite rare case that some could articulate both the funny stories, but that intent of focusing on detail. I have certain tastes and approaches that are vastly different and certain level of stubbornness, but there are so many moments, when despite different methods and ways, I find myself thinking he is absolutely right!

It is really funny, how the keep industrial out of harsh noise was so controversial. Maybe it was more in the social media than anywhere else? I recall Harsh Truths attempted to turn it to some kind of statement against harmful ideologies in industrial. I didn't think that was at all the case, nor I thought there is anything offensive in the statement at all. Now that Sam explained his position, I can fully agree what he is saying. haha.

While I talk frequently of industrial-noise, I never really associate it with that industrial they are talking about. That industrial music, with the bounding "techno beats".. it's quite different of what I mean with industrial-noise, that is most of all kind of cultural milieu.

Where as noise can be, almost whatever. From fine arts, jazz, punk, metal, indie-rock, techno, and so on, you push to certain direction and eventually you might be reaching borders of expression that is noise.

Industrial had plenty of influence of avantgarde art, often crossing over to performance, installation, mail-art, video-art, and whatever. Often challenging what is norm or accepted in wider society. I suppose no need to describe what all fell under industrial movement. If something is industrial-noise, I would be pretty damn sure one can file Mauthausen Orchestra or Atrax Morgue, Dead Body Love and such under such term. They are clearly something else than free jazz going real nasty. Something else than couple punks that rejected guitars, and kept the amps and distortion pedals to make energetic loud noise. Mentioned bands fall into lineage, where many of elements are found (even if not exclusively) from industrial. Sure, they have nothing really in common with the industrial-rock or industrial-metal. They may not have beats or music or fill many other expected qualities. Yet still, I would be surprised if someone would see that these bands do not come from the tradition of TG, Come Org, Broken Flag...  but step by step taking it further and further away into... industrial-noise.  Anyways, when Sam says it was most of all for being annoyed of false advertising, I certainly get it 100%. Grabbing the praised harsh noise tape or live gig, and finding out it wasn't noise at all, but dance music with some distortion.
 

Some of the greatest things on podcast is the detailed explanation of the ballet theme that dominates The Rita works for years. Some weeks ago I wrote that piece combining The Rita and Rober Longo into "book + noise combo review" type of thing. Longo often uses these iconic images, but there is usually study of power and violence behind the seemingly clean images. When one tends to see clean and neat images of ballet in The Rita, there is quite a contrast when hearing Sam describe about the dark history of ballet, how that is big part of the obsession in there. It sets whole thing to a new level. Certainly recommended to listen this episode to get what he does. When it has suddenly clear links of human trafficking, brothels, objectification of women, control and abuse to quite brutal level.  The story how it all started with sudden revelation and quickly being totally immersive theme, where one can't really see that there would be need to do anything else than that.

It's more than 2 hours, but feels like... could have been more!
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« Reply #184 on: March 22, 2022, 11:16:13 PM »

Much to digest with this episode, and so many potential comments. First of all, one of the best episodes yet. I agree that even with the 2+ hour run time I could have easily listened to even more! This honestly feels like a companion piece to the Tights Worship documentary. If anyone has not seen that then I highly recommend checking it out. A lot of insight into the process of creating releases is given with footage of nylon stocking/contact mic sessions, sound sourcing, choreography, ballet ephemera, etc.

I am admittedly more of a fan of his early works like Sea Wolf Leviathan and Thousands of Dead Gods, but the absolute fanaticism of the ballet era is undeniable. Even newer releases that I do not find as sonically appealing due to the ultra detailed examination  of crackle and certain tones are fascinating in their overall scope and vision. It is hard to say anything that hasn’t already been said about The Rita, but even those who may not be fans of his particular brand of noise have to appreciate the utterly insane dedication and immersion in the concepts he explores.

Also I chuckled a bit as he lists so many industrial releases after the talk of the “KEEP INDUSTRIAL OUT OF HARSH NOISE” campaign. I understand the point he was making, of course. Also his defense of sub-genres is certainly food for thought. I have always thought that endless reduction into sub-sub-sub genres was embarrassing, but he makes a good point here! Perhaps after all it is simply the product of obsessive listening and one’s attempts to distill their interests into the most reduced state to produce the most satisfaction. I think where his “subgenre-fication” differs from most is that it’s actually a product of intention. The manifestos, hard rules, deep analysis of the walls of noise. Most micro genres are just the product of too much time spent on the internet by my estimation. If they were all to be developed by the aforementioned methods, perhaps they would have more weight.
« Last Edit: March 22, 2022, 11:29:46 PM by NerveGas » Logged
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« Reply #185 on: March 23, 2022, 08:07:00 AM »

Also I chuckled a bit as he lists so many industrial releases after the talk of the “KEEP INDUSTRIAL OUT OF HARSH NOISE” campaign.

Yeah, and so did Oskar, haha. To me it seemed sort of expected, since Sam has always praised these artists/albums.

There is moment when they talk about noise, that is sort of unrecognizable. Idea being that should/could one remember the patterns of noise release. Listening enough of something, and you just might learn how it goes. For me, noise that is memorable, is good thing. I was talking with one friend who said that he was listening so much was it the 2000's album of Cazzodio, for some reason being among his favorite albums. Then giving it decade rest, and returning to album, but concluding that it just wasn't the same anymore, when you would know everything before it happened. Of course Cazzodio has more structure, composition, sheer musicality than pure noise. Anyways, he'd know each time what will come next. Every crashing metal percussion or rhythm loop burned in brain. So, he said, as great as it is, it no longer works out when there is no more surprises. Of course cd is keeper, but unlikely to hit the player frequently.
I got friend who said, he doesn't need to listen SLAYER anymore. Every classic Slayer album he can run in his brain, knowning how it goes. Instead greatest thrash albums, he'd listen something less good, hehe, as the good things are already immortalized in the brain and can not provide new impact.

What Sam is talking, that ideal would not be not to remember or memorize the album structure, but opposite. Be able to experience it repeatedly. It would be ideal that album can provide always the surprises. Sudden ruptures, gaps, snaps and such. It is nice perspective to noise. I recall when Lasse Marhaug said that there has been incidents like when radio played his noise, and he realised it was his work only after DJ mentioned what record it was. I'm quite sure I would recognize my own works from relatively small fragment, but it is also interesting point that do you have to? Does the noise, or HNW be identifiable and for what reasons? If it should be identifiable, does it apply to any situation, or is this kind of wrong way to approach it, when the usage of piece may not be meant to be some random background muzak coming from anonymous stream, but comprehensive piece, that includes physical object, artwork, liner-notes, perhaps even act of consciously purchasing it... and then the XX minutes of sort of anonymous unrecognizable crackling crusty sound that comes with all previously mentioned? It may be that material is not about "catchy song", but situation that one needs to submit for conscious and devoted listening.



(Like I noticed one Grunt "Hehku" track was in youtube. I do not put the advance tracks nor album online, as my intention was hoping that this would be only listened from CD, with the artwork. Sound also adjusted in ways that it works best on stand alone CD in its entirety, not meant to be on mixed playlist of as-loud-as-possible types of noise mastering. Stand alone CD would make listener to adjust volume desires to this piece in particular what will make it work better. It works fine, but not as intended when it was finalized)
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« Reply #186 on: March 23, 2022, 10:42:46 AM »

should/could one remember the patterns of noise release. Listening enough of something, and you just might learn how it goes.
A few years ago someone, who shall be left me unnamed here, tried to pull my leg. I got what seemed to be the usual email to Team Boro, "Hey man, love your label, here's a soundcloud link, maybe you could..." yadayada. I guess I was just bored so for once I actually pressed the link. Fuck, this sounds really good! What are the odds!" Listened again. "Waaaait a minute, somethings familiar here..." Listened again. Yep. Treriksröset's Heteronormativ Musik... played in reverse. I sent the thing to Tommy who was amused and puzzled, as I recall it. The guy who sent the thing replied to me that he didn't mean to offend with his little prank. Just test how trained the noise listeners (mine in this case) ears were, and how much attention noise heads actually pay.
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« Reply #187 on: March 23, 2022, 04:58:30 PM »

Also I chuckled a bit as he lists so many industrial releases after the talk of the “KEEP INDUSTRIAL OUT OF HARSH NOISE” campaign.

Yeah, and so did Oskar, haha. To me it seemed sort of expected, since Sam has always praised these artists/albums.


Oh yeah of course. No surprise necessarily. It makes perfect sense too. Whether directly or in some abstract sense, it’s very easy to see how power electronics or industrial would be appealing medium given his interests sonically and thematically. And his appreciation for such acts has always been worn on his sleeve. As he said “KEEP INDUSTRIAL OUT OF HARSH NOISE” does not mean “everyone who listens to industrial is an idiot” haha!

Also I am not tapped into social media “scene” so I am unaware of anything regarding the statement or it’s various interpretations by others. To me it was just the Treriksröset split cover art which I thought was great!
« Last Edit: March 24, 2022, 01:23:18 AM by NerveGas » Logged
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« Reply #188 on: March 24, 2022, 04:29:26 PM »

Love the skate talk.  Loved the Vancouver history lesson.
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« Reply #189 on: March 25, 2022, 12:18:37 AM »

Love the skate talk.

Same here. I had no idea Sam worked for Skull Skates. Or Barrier Kult. But looking at the graphic design of those brands really makes sense now as far as design choices and whatnot. This is probably my favorite WCN interview so far. Also really dug his top 5 contemporary noise projects…
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« Reply #190 on: March 25, 2022, 12:56:56 AM »

Really glad to hear everyone has been enjoying the podcast, haven't had time to chime in on much here, but I read everything and appreciate the comments. The interview with Sam turned out particularly good. The numbers are going crazy too - over 1600 views in 3 days.

I want to take this opportunity to invite everyone who has been watching/listening and enjoying what I'm doing to support via Patreon. Chipping in a few € per month goes a long way for me, both symbolically and in a material sense, and at the moment, the number of supporters is quite out of proportion with the number of viewers. The weekly episode schedule is really intense for me to keep up with, so I'm really counting on your support to carry this on. I do also offer plenty of perks for those who support - exclusive material, private episodes of Noise On The Run, and discounts at the mailorder:

https://www.patreon.com/whitecentipedenoise
https://www.patreon.com/whitecentipedenoise
https://www.patreon.com/whitecentipedenoise

Thanks,

Oskar
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« Reply #191 on: March 26, 2022, 04:56:46 PM »

Industrial: "non-academic weird ass music, for a given value of weird ass"
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« Reply #192 on: March 26, 2022, 08:13:58 PM »

New episode of Noise On The Run is out now:

"Talking Shit, or An Attempt To Address Underground Ethics"

https://www.patreon.com/whitecentipedenoise
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« Reply #193 on: March 27, 2022, 08:22:23 AM »

"Talking Shit, or An Attempt To Address Underground Ethics"

Interesting shit talk, especially the first bit about the touring band sandwich. Maybe I've been in Japan too long, but it now feels natural to me that the headliner, invariably the out-of-towner, play last. (Masonna a definite exception!) Part of this tendency may be supported by the way shows are run, ie like clockwork, but I've never questioned it. Though I do recall once, years ago, when an audience member, possibly from Switzerland or France(?), rolled eyes at me at the headliner policy. I honestly didn't get what he was on about- isn't that how it's always done? (Well, I guess I do now, so apologies Swiss or French guy, if I appeared confused!)

I understood from the shit talk that the issue was (at least partly) about playing to an audience of fickle willingness to stick around. I've definitely seen this at crossover events, like the place is packed but once Zeni Geva leaves the stage motherfuckers just clear out. (Which at least from the point of view of someone who wants to see Mikawa freaking out would have been perfectly fine with me!) But don't know that I've ever really seen much of that at a proper noise show. Which I'd assumed was because motherfuckers were there for the headliner.

Would then be curious if there were other sorts of region-specific policies on line-ups, as I'm not sure the subject has ever been discussed.
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« Reply #194 on: March 27, 2022, 09:29:04 PM »

"Talking Shit, or An Attempt To Address Underground Ethics"

Interesting shit talk, especially the first bit about the touring band sandwich. Maybe I've been in Japan too long, but it now feels natural to me that the headliner, invariably the out-of-towner, play last. (Masonna a definite exception!) Part of this tendency may be supported by the way shows are run, ie like clockwork, but I've never questioned it. Though I do recall once, years ago, when an audience member, possibly from Switzerland or France(?), rolled eyes at me at the headliner policy. I honestly didn't get what he was on about- isn't that how it's always done? (Well, I guess I do now, so apologies Swiss or French guy, if I appeared confused!)

I understood from the shit talk that the issue was (at least partly) about playing to an audience of fickle willingness to stick around. I've definitely seen this at crossover events, like the place is packed but once Zeni Geva leaves the stage motherfuckers just clear out. (Which at least from the point of view of someone who wants to see Mikawa freaking out would have been perfectly fine with me!) But don't know that I've ever really seen much of that at a proper noise show. Which I'd assumed was because motherfuckers were there for the headliner.

Would then be curious if there were other sorts of region-specific policies on line-ups, as I'm not sure the subject has ever been discussed.

The idea of the headliner playing last has always seemed to be how it was in Michigan, outside of the exception that the local act drew more crowd than the touring act which might prompt them to play last in order to get more people to stay for the headliner. For a while in the mid 2000s when everything was very much on "punk time/Party time" it might be whoever was there played in that order, varying degrees of fucked up. And eventually devolved out of "cool kids" in the scene into some other bullshit hipster party that caused me to stop going to shows really, folks with rich parents and warehouses.

To me this was always the way it was done, though a good friend who puts on the bulk of the shows (which were always more on time) that I continue to go to (post corona are there even shows anymore?) would usually structure it:

Music style groups
Noise but not like harsh (or really harsh)
Headliner
Harshest of the harsh

So a "headliner" might play and then other people could get out before someone like Skin Graft did his set. Which is fine, like you mentioned with Mikawa. I remember seeing Caroliner play at a first Saturday at a museum back in 2008, place was packed full of hipsters and art folks. the other groups on the bill just got pushed out, never ended up playing. But Caroliner started playing and suddenly there were only like 25 or 30 people left of the 500+ or so that had been there, much better evening instantly. But the mixed bill seems like a model that works well and allowed for more time to sneak out back and talk shit durning the sets you cared less about, catch up with folks and I think due to the variation in styles brought a bit more cash at the end of the night to whoever was touring.

I haven't seen or heard of many all noise bills in a while unless its like a "fest" or "anniversary" style. I'm sure it happens but I've aged out and don't interact with the same people, plus the troniks forum was really essential for finding house shows/what was happening in the region etc, which is probably now all social media related business. I wonder if this is indicative of the larger National/International scene?
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