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Author Topic: Muslimgauze  (Read 31275 times)
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Bloated Slutbag
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« Reply #75 on: July 05, 2020, 08:41:40 AM »

As far as industrial, I'm essentially repeating myself from page 3 of this topic in suggesting that the earlier Muslimgauze is somewhat less distinctly of its own category to that point. Look to SPK Zamia Lehmanni. And a good chunk of Zoviet France straight up to appearance of Rapoon, and then to early Rapoon and maybe some DVOA. I'd put down some of the (80s) overlap to the technology of the time. And that there are quite a number of others along similar lines...Cranioclast...whom I'd tend to associate with the anything goes experimental/industrial/academic/whatever 80s college radio (since that's mostly how I heard it all).

@accidental, I'm not going to waste your time in trying to sell the early stuff, but I'm rather partial to Flajelata which for me is a pretty solid "cinematic" listen from the second track on through.
edit
-> dedication on the flip-side "to all dissidents from the Soviet Union"

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Zeno Marx
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« Reply #76 on: August 05, 2020, 11:02:39 PM »

Yes I totally agree, Muslimgauze had a lot of positive feedback in the "danceable music" closest to the industrial scene (like EBM for example) - maybe because of more "groovy" releases like Mullah Said - although I think (and it´s in my opinion pretty evident) he never had the intention to let people dance, rather to put some rhythmic elements in his music. And yes, it´s industrial music at his finest! I don´t own any Muslimgauze album so far but I´m planning to buy the first works, which I like a lot (especially "Buddhist on fire"), and "Mullah Said" if I find a copy for decent prices. I would be very curious to know how he worked on his samples during mixes and manipulation, love the weird "collage" way they sound.
I listened to Mullah Said the other day, and I've been thinking about it ever since.  The title track is up there with "Khan Younis" (Hamas Arc album version) in favorite songs from him, and I purposely call them songs.  They're catchy.  They feel like they're layered and mixed like traditional songs are.  The album has a groove and a heightened accessibility.  It flies against Silvum's industrial categorization, which is why I think it stands out for me, especially with his latter work.
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accidental
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« Reply #77 on: August 10, 2020, 03:45:16 PM »

@accidental, I'm not going to waste your time in trying to sell the early stuff, but I'm rather partial to Flajelata which for me is a pretty solid "cinematic" listen from the second track on through.

That attracted me in ways which Uzi could not
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Zeno Marx
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« Reply #78 on: December 03, 2020, 06:22:32 PM »

One direction that I'm the verge of getting (but not quite) is that of the looping brevity, the pure rhythm studies; Blue Mosque being a notable example.
At times, like lately, I find Blue Mosque maybe the most meditative of all his work.  It truly is a rhythmic study.  For those who are drawn to industrial field recordings for their repetitive, reflective atmosphere, this might be an album for you.
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SILVUM
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« Reply #79 on: December 03, 2020, 07:54:27 PM »

It flies against Silvum's industrial categorization, which is why I think it stands out for me, especially with his latter work.

By "Industrial" I mean a theoretical perspective, he was in UK industrial culture, what I mean by industrial, and it's obvious if you read how official and confrontational all interviews are, and you can feel a VERY Cabs influence on his visual aesthetic, industrial as in the TG classic Industrial like confronting reality as a starting perspective of the body of work, and I think he just picked up on the idea of directly focusing on political conflict with his work, industrial in that way, he isnt like, making sick dance tracks as day 1 purpose.  He is endlessly looping "ethnic" drums and imitating styles as a sort of narrative scaffolding for as he states, basically he wants you to read the titles and research, a very theoretical use and purpose vs what I think lots of other rhythmic industrial is more just - oh this is cool I like this sound, basically wallpaper dance music, grab a sound.  I don't think Muslimgauze was trying to make like "Chill Lounge" cds, it's obsessive headline cutting industrial realism, and I think he realized that it makes the most sense for the material to replicate the "sounds" of the regions of focus, vs just doing what everyone does and lean on a synth and scream, ah, yes, heavy synth and demonic commando vocals, very 1920s American South..  No Muslimgauze is made by a man that can dance, that's clear, it's industrial music (right technically it's like "Atmospheric Post Industrial Rhythm compositions), not dance music.  I'm not saying he doesn't make "dance music", like ending up on those tangents with great success (dont forget the shitty "hip hop" stuff where he was just like, sure i'll try any style but it's still all about bombings), but it always rings far more political than like Robert Rich with some tabla and goatee bros with rainsticks.  Not Industrial as in it sounds like Throbbing Gristle, Industrial as in, he really thought about what people were doing with materials, and he went with his version of the direct headline immediacy thing in his own way.  And I feel his work resonates to me because it hit an enclosed mutation level where he could use ANY material at it just sounds like a weird Muslimgauze track.   I'm not gonna edit that ramble, sorry, it makes enough sense,,,

BUT, I'm mainly here for stuff like Mullah Said and Iranian Female Olympic Table Tennis Team Theme, I like the "chill" tracks, sorry Muslimgauze.
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« Reply #80 on: December 20, 2020, 12:48:30 PM »

I found a copy of Madrass Sitar Burning in a local store and I agree with Silvum, there´s a strong "intellectual" intent below almost all the Muslimgauze releases, in the sense of making "uncomfortable" music also when it comes only to loop ethnic music patterns. He has simply thrown all his political and musical obsessions into the project with the precise intent of letting the people think about the message and probably go deeper in the topic. Which probably partially also explains the extremely high amount of releases he released over the years.
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https://sabruxa.bandcamp.com/ (Industrial / ambient)
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