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Author Topic: Lack of post production  (Read 1654 times)
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Stipsi
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« on: April 23, 2020, 10:59:27 PM »

I'm not sure this is the correct section for this thread, but it has to do with production techniques, so ...
I'd like to know who works doing little or zero post production.
I mean no editing (maybe just spaces to separate the tracks), no plug ins, etc ...
practically live.
 I m not talking about HNW ,because seems obvious there isn't so much post production skills behind it.
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theworldisawarfilm
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« Reply #1 on: April 24, 2020, 12:37:56 AM »

Doesn't sound like much fun to me.
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Andrew McIntosh
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« Reply #2 on: April 24, 2020, 01:53:14 AM »

I've done that. Got results I was happy with, too. It can work out well, sometimes. But I usually do individual pieces one bit at a time.
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NocturnalHiss
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« Reply #3 on: April 24, 2020, 05:15:56 PM »

"live" recordings are cool if you can pull them off

but i find even a really good live take usually sounds better with some mixing and post-production

and of course a bad live recording will sound MUCH better if you can edit out the flubs and boring bits afterwards -- in which case it's a question of where do you want to spend your time, perfecting the performance or perfecting the sound after the fact
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Soloman Tump
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« Reply #4 on: April 25, 2020, 12:55:38 AM »

I prefer recording live when I can.
Sometimes because of my kit limitations I end up needing to do overdubs and layering so I will multitrack in Audacity after, fade tracks in/out and crop out fluff.... But a straight from live in one take track is the holy grail for me.
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« Reply #5 on: April 25, 2020, 03:15:17 AM »

Sometimes this is a good way to work. Depends entirely on personal preferences of course, but i do some of my solo records with one line into tape or computer. Just one file in the end, not much to edit. If you normally work with hardware, synths, pedals etc its a good way to learn your way around new equipment and focus. Also the best way to be prepared for concerts.
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JLIAT
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« Reply #6 on: April 25, 2020, 09:33:39 AM »

The OP mentioned HNW as not requiring much post-production, but what of noise itself? Might it be that the more a noise piece has post-production, edits etc, (which edit out 'the flubs and boring bits ') the less it becomes noise and the more it becomes composed music.

In answer to the OP, I've therefore stopped any post production. It might (IMO) be like painting out the drips in an abstract expressionist painting.
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Cementimental
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« Reply #7 on: April 25, 2020, 11:01:50 PM »

It might (IMO) be like painting out the drips in an abstract expressionist painting.

Quote from: Stan Brakhage
They were, like, commenting, and they used the words "chance operations" — which was no bother to me because I was hearing it regularly from John Cage — and the power and the wonder of it and so forth. This really angered Pollock very deeply and he said, "Don't give me any of your 'chance operations.'" He said, "You see that doorknob?" and there was a doorknob about fifty feet from where he was sitting that was, in fact, the door that everyone was going to have to exit. Drunk as he was, he just with one swirl of his brush picked up a glob of paint, hurled it, and hit that doorknob smack-on with very little paint over the edges. And then he said, "And that's the way out."
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JLIAT
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« Reply #8 on: April 26, 2020, 09:11:35 AM »

It might (IMO) be like painting out the drips in an abstract expressionist painting.

Quote from: Stan Brakhage
"with very little paint over the edges."

Rauschenberg's identical paintings, or erased DE Kooning drawing!!!  

https://2j29m13d0esqmrduc3h1lx97-wpengine.netdna-ssl.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/01/handprint1_Pollock.jpg

Edit: Not so serious, "glob of paint" Pollock used house gloss paint!? More serious, Cage's use of indeterminacy  was a deliberate compositional tool, action painting was more akin to free improvisation. The two as I see it seem very much opposed, the use of indeterminacy constraining the 'performer's'  actions, the spontaneous actions of action painting or free improvisation not.


« Last Edit: April 27, 2020, 06:36:48 AM by JLIAT » Logged
zd313
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« Reply #9 on: December 15, 2020, 03:05:20 PM »

Sometimes this is a good way to work. Depends entirely on personal preferences of course, but i do some of my solo records with one line into tape or computer. Just one file in the end, not much to edit. If you normally work with hardware, synths, pedals etc its a good way to learn your way around new equipment and focus. Also the best way to be prepared for concerts.

i agree, and i think it is crucial to get to a point where you're not just 'jamming' but you're comfortable with turning on your gear and letting it rip. obviously this takes a lot of "jamming"/playing around, but often i set out with the intention of multi tracking and become very satisfied w the live take (or realize any addition will just clutter) and leave it at that. and yeah if it sounds good, no actual mixing needed. if its a tape, i don't see the need for any mastering either (not saying all tapes shouldn't be mastered, just that it can still be ok without it). its not planned but it often happens.
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Andrew McIntosh
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« Reply #10 on: December 24, 2020, 11:07:32 AM »

Quote from: Stan Brakhage
They were, like, commenting, and they used the words "chance operations" — which was no bother to me because I was hearing it regularly from John Cage — and the power and the wonder of it and so forth. This really angered Pollock very deeply and he said, "Don't give me any of your 'chance operations.'" He said, "You see that doorknob?" and there was a doorknob about fifty feet from where he was sitting that was, in fact, the door that everyone was going to have to exit. Drunk as he was, he just with one swirl of his brush picked up a glob of paint, hurled it, and hit that doorknob smack-on with very little paint over the edges. And then he said, "And that's the way out."

Pollock was a bit of a cunt.
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« Reply #11 on: December 25, 2020, 07:56:31 PM »

I guess if you plan ahead and set up with the intention of recording "finished" sound you don't need post production. That said I personally find that much more effort than it's worth, we everyone can have access to great post production tools no matter what your budget and honestly it's just sensible to at least check the levels before sending your stuff to the pressing plant / whatever you use to make your physical releases.
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Into_The_Void
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« Reply #12 on: January 13, 2021, 04:46:06 PM »

It depends, of course, on how good is the recorded material without any editing. Working a lot on single sounds and samples, I try to get the better result I need with the take, working a lot on the effects regulation and equalizing from the mixer. But it basically never happens that the result is so satisfactory to skip the post-editing phase. 
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« Reply #13 on: January 14, 2021, 11:33:01 AM »

It depends on the material, the intention of the recording (or the whole project) and the desired aesthetic.

There may be cases, that a "live"-recording without much (or any) postproduction my be desirable, f.e. to achieve a certain rawness or immediacy.

When working with vinyl, due to the requirements of the duplication process, a certain degree of postproduction seems to be mandatory.
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JLIAT
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« Reply #14 on: January 14, 2021, 04:25:30 PM »

The thought crossed my mind that “working with vinyl” like working with CD Cdr and cassette is now an aesthetic decision* and no longer a physical requirement. *with the advent of digital downloads.
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